Bonnie Hunter Scrap Quilt Blocks: Idaho Square Dance

By Diane Harris, QM Associate Editor     dianeharris Bonnie Hunter Scrap Quilt Blocks: Idaho Square Dance

 

Earlier this year, we pulled together a team of enthusiastic people to make scrap quilts using Bonnie Hunter’s Addicted to Scraps blocks. Every regular issue of Quiltmaker has a new scrappy quilt block pattern from Bonnie. All of the blocks are featured on the Addicted to Scraps online page. Click on each block to find an idea and cutting dimensions for a scrappy quilt!

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Idaho Square Dance is the Addicted to Scraps block in QM’s May/June issue. It’s an easy block with great impact! It’s perfect for scrapbag sewing! It makes an efficient Leader/Ender project!

Today I have a quilt to share with you, made from Idaho Square Dance blocks by Sheri Wonderling from Brookville, Pennsylvania. Sheri is part of our Scrap Addicts team.

sheri1 Bonnie Hunter Scrap Quilt Blocks: Idaho Square Dance

Sheri started with a bin of 1.5″ strips.

Sheri started with a bin of 1.5″ strips. This tells me she’s been following Bonnie’s advice about cutting your scraps into useable sizes. If you’re still stuffing leftovers into a box, read Scrap User’s System by Bonnie Hunter. Your fabric will never be the same!

sheri2 Bonnie Hunter Scrap Quilt Blocks: Idaho Square Dance

Sheri’s bin of 1.5″ squares were put to good use.

It’s pretty amazing that leftovers can move from what’s above to what’s below.

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Idaho Square Dance quilt by Sheri Wonderling

Sheri used a classic cheddar color for her sashing strips, scrappy blues for cornerstones and navy for the outside setting triangles.

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Quilting detail

Sheri tells me, “It has its share of flaws but it was a great learning experience for me. This was the first time that I put blocks on point. I would always shy away from that because it is intimidating. I hope that with this quilt I can encourage others to step outside their comfort zone and push past what they think will be too hard.

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The pieced backing for Sheri’s quilt

“And in true Bonnie Hunter fashion, I was trying to shop my stash. I had a little bit of fabric left over from my borders and not enough of the blue. So what is a Bonnie fan going to do? We do what Bonnie does. Piece the back. I love the stripes.”

I’m sure you’ll agree that this indeed looks like a Bonnie Hunter quilt! Quiltmaker congratulates Sheri Wonderling on a job well done.

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Have you made a quilt using Addicted to Scraps blocks by Bonnie Hunter? We’d love to see it. Please email photos to editor@quiltmaker.com.

QMATSB Bonnie Hunter Scrap Quilt Blocks: Idaho Square Dance

On sale now!

Supplement your stash with our Bonnie Hunter bundle. Includes Bonnie’s best-selling More Adventures with Leaders and Enders book!

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Scrap Quilt Ideas: Santa Fe by Donna Hanna

Quiltmaker’s Scrap Squad is a small select group of readers who make scrap quilts from QM patterns. We share their creations on Quilty Pleasures to inspire you to make scrappy quilts from the quilting fabrics you already own.

QM scrap squadB3 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Santa Fe by Donna HannaToday’s quilt is called Santa Fe. It appears in the May/June issue of Quiltmaker, on newsstands now. It’s available on our website in print or digital versions.

QMMP 150600 SANTA 506flat Scrap Quilt Ideas: Santa Fe by Donna Hanna

Santa Fe, Quiltmaker May/June ’15, designed by Janice Averill, made by Hatty Brown. Fabric: Tonga Calypso Batiks from Timeless Treasures.

Santa Fe was designed by Janice Averill and made by Hatty Brown. The original fabrics are Calypso Batiks from Timeless Treasures. The digital pattern for Santa Fe is available, as well as a kit for the quilt shown above.

Today’s featured quilt is by Donna Hanna from Bangor, Pennsylvania.

donnacropped1 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Santa Fe by Donna Hanna

Donna Hanna from Bangor, Pennsylvania

You’ll hear from Donna in her own words below.

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The pattern for Santa Fe intrigued me as soon as I saw it.

This plaid fabric was my  color inspiration. I chose a palette of bright green, light magenta, dark magenta gray, yellow and aqua. I used a white background so the bright colors would pop.

Fabric  225x300 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Santa Fe by Donna Hanna

This plaid quilting fabric was my color inspiration for Santa Fe.

I needed to adjust the block construction slightly in order to use the plaid, because I didn’t like how the half-square triangles broke up the plaid when I used it as the background of the stars.

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I didn’t care for the look of the broken up plaid.

So, I replaced the half-square triangles for the star background with flying geese to prevent the mismatched plaid.

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Flying Geese can be star points.

Other than that small change I followed the pattern as published.

DSC00682 opt opt Scrap Quilt Ideas: Santa Fe by Donna Hanna

My star blocks use Flying Geese for the star points.

After I chose my color palette, I realized that my variety of light magenta pieces was less than what I think is optimal for a scrap quilt. That led me to use a different constant magenta in each of the X pieces.

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I used the same magenta fabric in all of the X pieces.

I quilted with a random all-over freehand design of feathery swirls in white.

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Quilting on the Santa Fe quilt

I pieced magenta and aqua checkerboard squares for the border, and finished off with a magenta binding.

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Donna Hanna’s finished Santa Fe quilt

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Editor’s note by Diane Harris: This is another great job by Donna for QM’s Scrap Squad. These quilters are so brave to take each pattern and make it their own. Donna didn’t hesitate to add a different border, and it’s a terrific finish to her quilt. All in all, a lovely piece by an adventuresome creator!

See slideshows of past Scrap Squad quilts.

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The Quilt Blocks That Came Full Circle

By Diane Harris, QM Associate Editor                                                                   dhheadshot The Quilt Blocks That Came Full Circle

My local quilt guild had a garage sale last week. It’s my favorite night of the year.

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Quilters shop my guild’s garage sale.

There are always treasures to be found and they’re often priced to sell! All of the money goes into the guild’s treasury, so it’s a good thing for everyone.

fullcircle2 The Quilt Blocks That Came Full Circle

85 blocks for three dollars

I was excited to find this bag of 85 checkerboard blocks for just $3. The quilter was considerate when she noted that some were 7.25″ and some were 7.5″. I appreciated that, but I didn’t think a quarter-inch was going to be that much of a problem. Subtle foreshadowing there.

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All of the blocks together: yoogly.

The next day I put all of the blocks up on my design wall together. Pretty horrific. Not cohesive, not pleasing, not good.

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Blocks with grays or dark neutrals

But this is the kind of challenge I adore, so I started playing around. I pulled out the blocks with dark gray or dark neutrals and above is the result. Nothing much happening.

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Blocks with yellow

Then I grouped all the blocks that used yellow. Now we’re getting somewhere. I see possibility.

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Blocks with red in all its glory

Next came blocks with any form of red: hot pink, reddish-purple, bluish-purple, fire engine red, maroon, orange-red. At this point I was excited!

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Blocks with high contrast

What about focusing on contrast? That thought led to the high contrast grouping above. Exciting stuff!

lightbulb The Quilt Blocks That Came Full Circle Light Bulb Moment lightbulb The Quilt Blocks That Came Full Circle

I can be a little slow on the uptake, and that’s my only explanation for what comes next. I’d been playing with the blocks for a full day when it dawned on me that these were blocks from an exchange I’d been in charge of two years ago! Oh my word. I had set this up myself! We used “Amish Buggy Quilt” instructions by Karen Griska and the Empire Quilters.

The winner of the blocks (I can’t remember who it was) had put them on the garage sale. I imagine she felt they were too ugly, or too disparate, or too many different sizes to deal with. I understood completely, but I was more determined than ever to do something wonderful with them.

And this was in spite of my growing awareness that the blocks weren’t just 1/4″ off, but ranged from 7″ to 7 5/8″. Much too much to fudge, and I would know because I’m really good at fudging.

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I tried but eventually gave up on the blocks in the bottom two rows.

I tried the arrangement above but eventually gave up on the blocks in the bottom two rows. Their colors are muted—very gray compared to the rest.

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Leftover solid quilt blocks that just didn’t fit in

I also decided I’d need to trim the largest blocks and leave out the smallest blocks that were only 7″. This gave me a workable set with a variance of about 3/8″.

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Mismatched intersections

I’d learned on an earlier quilt that if you ignore the awful intersections, sometimes the entire row does fit just fine with the next row. It’s like it all evens out somehow.

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More badly off intersections

So I just made peace with it. The intersections were ugly but the rows fit together just fine.

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I settled on this arrangement of the quilt blocks.

I settled on this arrangement for the quilt blocks. Two blocks bother me but I’m going to leave it alone. I plan to incorporate the remaining blocks into the backing.

I love this quilt top in spite of its flaws. It’s vibrant and interesting! I’ll have beautiful feathers quilted in it, to contrast with the straight, simple piecing. I think it’s going to become a favorite. Not bad for three bucks. 

Suppose they’ll ever ask me to be in charge of block exchanges again?

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Watch Quiltmaker’s Block Network for free block patterns and great instructions on all sorts of quilting techniques.

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Chat with a Quilter: Janice Averill

I love my job as online editor for Quiltmaker because I have the pleasure of talking to so many great quilt designers. Granted, I never get to meet them but we have lovely chats over email. Nonetheless, I still pick up great bits of advice for quilters and hear amazing quilt journeys.

Today, I’m sharing a chat with Janice Averill, designer of Santa Fe, a quilt from our May/June issue.

1416268219 Chat with a Quilter: Janice Averill

Hello Janice! Photo courtesy of Iris Quilts-Janice’s website!

What was the process of making Santa Fe?

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Lately, I’ve become fascinated with the designs on decorative tiles. The designs typically have a diagonal line of symmetry. This creates a design that looks far more intricate than it actually is. This quilt was designed while at my local Best Buy Store patiently waiting for them to set up a new mobile phone contract for me and my family. It was a long enough process to begin with. Then once the computer gremlins of cyber space got involved the process got even longer. But it was O.K. because I had my sketch book with me. (P.S. Janice’s blog post about this quilt is a must-read!)

What style of quilting do you enjoy?

When it comes to designing and making quilts I’d have to say I’m a fairly traditional quilter. My designs are based on traditional quilt layouts and I use a lot of traditional shapes for my quilt blocks. I do love to take workshops at my guild with different instructors so I can expose myself to new ideas and techniques. Sometimes I am able to translate these experiences into a new creation.

Favorite and least favorite part of the quilting process?

My all-time favorite part of the process is planning/drafting the design and picking the colors/fabrics. I also enjoy cutting and piecing very much. I appreciate precision and trying to make all my points match exactly, but if they are still off after ripping out the same seam three times, I’ll leave that one alone and move on. I have to admit that trying to make 100 of the same block can become tiresome if I’m short on time for a deadline.

I guess I would also have to say that the final quilting of the layers isn’t one of my favorite tasks either. This is because I have yet to develop my technique to a level that is acceptable to me to have on my precious creation. I do hope to someday to overcome this obstacle and master the task. For now I’m content with sketching out ideas and let my long arm quilter, Janice Roy, do her thing.

What has your quilt journey taken you?

Quilting has brought me to a more fulfilling avenue for expressing my creative spirit and sharing it with others. It’s also given me new career opportunities and adventures. First I started out by teaching quilting at my local quilt shop. That’s where I learned about the Connecticut Piecemakers Quilt guild. I joined the guild and at one of the guild meetings I made a contact with a representative for Quilting Treasures fabrics.

Eventually I began working for Quilting Treasures editing quilt pattern instructions. After a few years they asked me to design quilts for their fabric collections. From there I moved on to submitting my designs to quilting magazines. After a few tries I began to see my designs published! After having a number of designs published, I began to get messages from folks who liked my designs, which was very encouraging.

Where do you find inspiration for your quilts?

 Chat with a Quilter: Janice Averill

I find it helpful to have a sketch book with me so I can sketch whenever I am. You never know when and where inspiration will meet you. Inspiration doesn’t adhere to a rigid schedule. I found that the more I sketched, the easier it became to come up with new ideas. With this new skill came the ability to see a new design idea in just about anything I see. This can really make my husband nuts when we shop together.

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Scrap Quilt Ideas: A Flower Garden by Pam Snow

Quiltmaker’s Scrap Squad is a small select group of readers who make scrap quilts from QM patterns. We share their creations on Quilty Pleasures to inspire you to make scrappy quilts from the fabrics you already own. What could be better?

QM scrap squadB3 Scrap Quilt Ideas: A Flower Garden by Pam SnowToday’s featured quilt is by Pam Snow, who splits her time between Arizona and Kentucky. Pam was recently highlighted by Arizona Quilters on their Hall of Fame page.

pamcropped Scrap Quilt Ideas: A Flower Garden by Pam Snow

Pam Snow

Pam made a version of Sea Glass, which was designed and made by Scott Murkin. It was part of our “Men at Work” focus in the May/June issue.

mayjune Scrap Quilt Ideas: A Flower Garden by Pam Snow

Quiltmaker May/June ’15 issue, on newsstands now

The original quilt was made with fabric from Quilting Treasures.

QMMP 150600 SEA 506flat Scrap Quilt Ideas: A Flower Garden by Pam Snow

Sea Glass by Scott Murkin for Quiltmaker’s May/June ’15 issue. Fabric: Quilting Treasures.

Sea Glass was just the right name for this quilt! Pam’s version is quite different. You’ll hear from Pam in her own words below.

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When I received my assignment of Sea Glass, I was immediately drawn to a pack of 26 fat quarters I won at a shop hop in Kentucky last fall. “Emma Lena’s Treasures” from The Gallery looked promising.

photo1 Scrap Quilt Ideas: A Flower Garden by Pam Snow

Fat quarter bundle

I decided that I would use these “scrappy” fabrics for the 4 1/2″ blocks and not make the triangle-squares. I chose gray and black Kona solids from Robert Kaufman for the corners and the accent strip.

I auditioned all 26 fat quarters on the gray and black. I eliminated eight fabrics because there was not enough contrast with the gray.

photo2 Scrap Quilt Ideas: A Flower Garden by Pam Snow

Rejected fabric

That left me with the assortment of 18 prints shown below.

photo3 Scrap Quilt Ideas: A Flower Garden by Pam Snow

Final selection

 

I cut the pieces I needed and found the Shape Cut Too by June Tailor to be very helpful when cutting the 1″ strips.

photo4 A Scrap Quilt Ideas: A Flower Garden by Pam Snow

Shape Cut Too

Below are all the cut pieces.

photo4 B Scrap Quilt Ideas: A Flower Garden by Pam Snow

Cut pieces

I followed the instructions for making the blocks using Stitch-and-Flip. I placed a piece of painter’s tape on my machine, lined up straight with the needle. This gave me a guide to follow when stitching the corner units. I prefer this method to marking a line on each square. (For another good method, see Donna’s post.)

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Painter’s tape guide

 

I used a 3″ ruler from Omnigrid to trim the lower right-hand corners of each block.

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Trimming with the 3″ ruler

I followed Quiltmaker’s instructions for inserting the black strip and trimming square.

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Finished block

I assembled 100 blocks and then began experimenting with placement. I knew I wanted a large block with the black lines on the diagonal.

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First audition

Here are two of my experimental blocks.

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Second audition

I wasn’t pleased with any of these blocks—I thought they were too scrappy. I decided to use a gray 8 1/2″ square in the center of each block.

A New Quilt Design

My new quilt design required only 144 of the pieced 4 1/2″ blocks. I was glad that I had done my experimenting with only 100 blocks. Each of the large quilt blocks measures 16 1/2″ square. The quilt is three blocks wide and four blocks long for a total of 12 blocks.  Each block requires 12 of the 4 1/2″ blocks and one 8 1/2″ solid gray patch. I placed a machine embroidery blackwork floral design in each square. The design is from Anita Goodesign’s Mix and Match Quilting collection, FLORAL QUILT.

I found pressing the seams open to be best for these blocks. There are many interconnecting seams, and pressing them open eliminates much of the bulk. It takes a little longer but I think you’ll find it’s worthwhile.

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Pressing seams open was helpful.

 

Here is one of the completed blocks.

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Finished block

And blocks sewn together.

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Ready for a border

For the inner border I cut 1 1/2″ width-of-fabric strips from black fabric. I auditioned the solid gray for the outer border but it was too dull for a scrappy quilt, so I decided to use the leftover strips from my fat quarters as the outer border.

I quilted it on my Handi Quilter Avante. I’ve only been longarm quilting for a few months but I’m learning. This quilt has a number of techniques including Pro Stitcher digitized designs and freehand quilting. A black binding finished off the quilt.

final quilt Scrap Quilt Ideas: A Flower Garden by Pam Snow

Miss Mattie’s Flower Garden by Pam Snow for Quiltmaker

Here is my finished quilt.

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Machine embroidered quilt label

I added a label, too. I named the quilt Miss Mattie’s Flower Garden, after my grandmother.

in the garden Scrap Quilt Ideas: A Flower Garden by Pam Snow

Miss Mattie’s Flower Garden takes a bow.

I do love the finished quilt.

Happy Quilting!

~Pam

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Making a Quilt Pattern Your Own

Headshot Making a Quilt Pattern Your OwnBy Shayla Wolf, QM Associate Editor

My favorite thing about being a quilt pattern designer is seeing how other quilters evolve my patterns to make them completely different. Whether it is using a color combo I never thought of, using 200 fabrics instead of 12 or fussy cutting pieces, it is a delight to see!

Many times we look at a pattern and think, “I want to make that exact quilt – fabrics and all.” Other times you may think, “That is an interesting design, I wonder what it would look like if….” Today I am challenging you to embrace that “wild” side and make your next project completely your own. Add different borders, use your stash, sew the blocks in a new arrangement; just try something different.

Spotlight Making a Quilt Pattern Your Own

January/February ’15, March/April ’15 and May/June ’15 Spotlight pages.

Each issue of Quiltmaker features a Spotlight quilt on the last page. These are quilts that began as QM patterns, but evolved into something completely unique! Here are a few to get you inspired!

Maila Josang took our Purr Patch to the next level! By continuing the pixelated patch theme outward, she created an entire scene around the cat that includes sky, hills, a tree and a bird! Purr Patch and 11 other adorable animals are available in the Patch Pals Collection book.

MailaJosang Making a Quilt Pattern Your Own

Diane Kuell took Bonnie Hunter’s Christmas Lights blocks and rearranged them into medallion design. Dianne Latendresse fell in love with Diane’s new design and used it to create this beauty. She pulled one fabric for the border and the rest fell into place. She added an appliqued block to the center and arranged the blocks so they radiated out from there.

DianneLantendresse Making a Quilt Pattern Your Own

Rebecca Hassell turned Jocelyn Ueng’s Dream On quilt into a Southwest statement. Not only did she mix up the colors, she added southwest-themed embroidery designs to the large open spaces. Dream On appeared in the March/April ’13 issue.

RebeccaHassell Making a Quilt Pattern Your Own

These are just a few of the wonderful quilts that have come to us! If you have made a Quiltmaker pattern, we would love to see it! Send your photos to sewtospeak@quiltmaker.com.

Here are 10 ideas for turning a quilt pattern into your own creation:

  1. Change the size of the quilt by adding or subtracting blocks.
  2. Change the size of the blocks – enlarge them or make them smaller.
  3. Create a new block arrangement by playing with the completed blocks on a design wall or open floor.
  4. Change the color scheme.
  5. Make the quilt scrappy with your stash fabrics.
  6. Add borders to make the quilt bigger.
  7. Add simple setting blocks to change the look of the quilt.
  8. Add embroidery or applique to open spaces.
  9. Use a different quilting motif to create a different texture.
  10. Fussy-cut patches to create some interest.

Need more inspiration? Check out what the talented Scrap Squad is creating.

Happy Designing!
Shayla

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Breast Cancer Healing Quilt

By Diane Harris, QM Associate Editor dhheadshot Breast Cancer Healing Quilt

A quilting friend of mine learned recently that she has breast cancer. She is well loved by the quilting community and so of course we’re making her a healing quilt. One person rallied the troops and sent out a simple pattern as a starting point. Another person will join the blocks together and someone else will quilt it.

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This is the pattern that came by email. When the Man of the House saw it on my desk, he wondered what it was, and so I explained. His response surprised me. He said, “Does she really need to be reminded that she has breast cancer?”

I chose not to dive into it at that moment, but it made me pensive. As I’ve mulled it over, these were some of my conclusions.

• It’s not reminding her she has breast cancer—because I’m quite certain that it’s already on her mind, all the time.
• It will be a reminder that dozens of female friends “get it” and are supporting and loving her though it all, whatever that ends up being.
• Women feel differently about breast cancer than men do. I can’t explain it exactly, but I feel strongly that this is true.
• I think the quilt will make her smile, and I suspect that humor may boost healing. I hope so.

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This is the block I made for my friend who has breast cancer.

This is the block I’ll mail off today. I was short on time so I kept it simple, but I think my message comes through. I hope and pray for all kinds of good things for my friend, who is a woman of faith, but is going to take a journey she didn’t choose.

I wonder what you think. Have you had breast cancer? How would a quilt of bras from friends have made you feel? Do you think it’s a supportive (ha) idea? I’m interested to hear your thoughts.

And because of all this, I had a mammogram this week. I hope you’ll get yours this year, too. It’s important:

bra3 Breast Cancer Healing Quilt

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Scott Flanagan: Male Quilter

If you haven’t heard, Quiltmaker has come into contact with three rare species in the quilt world. We featured three quilts made by three male quilters in our May/June issue. I had a chance to “virtually” chat with one of the three dashing quilters, Scott Flanagan. He designed Chop Suey, a pre-cut friendly twin size quilt.

Listen up ladies! This male quilter has a great story, and great advice, for any quilter.

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Meet Scott Flanagan, quilt designer. Photo courtesy of 4th & Main Designs Facebook (go check it out for more of Scott’s quilts!)

What’s your quilting story?

I grew up in Longmont, CO, and come from a family of crafters and woodworkers. My love of quilting started with my maternal grandmother. While growing up, I spent many hours helping her piece quilts for Lutheran World Relief, family and friends. In all, my quilting journey spans more than 20 years. I’ve made more than 300 quilts through the years, and my personal collection now contains about 150 of my favorites. I love to make special quilts for family and friends, sometimes for no reason at all, but partly for the joy it brings, and to see the reaction when the quilt is received. In 2011, I started my own pattern design company, “4th and Main Designs by Scott Alan Flanagan”, and spend much of my free time designing quilt patterns exclusively for Country Traditions. I love the endless possibilities available when designing patterns.

QM150602 Scott Flanagan: Male Quilter

Chop Suey designed by Scott

What “kind” of quilter are you?

I enjoy most all types of quilting and have done some modern and art style quilts but I am primarily a traditionalist in my quilting style, but love to use brights, batiks and non-traditional color schemes. Samplers are my favorite type of quilt to make and design because of the variety of blocks and I don’t get bored of making the same block over and over again.

What would you tell women about male quilters?

Seeing as I have ten female co-workers and only 1 other male coworker I am pleading the 5th on this question! All kidding aside though, I really don’t think there is a big difference between male and female quilters. I believe it comes down to the fact that we each have our own personality, vision, and inspiration and that in turn is what makes every quilter, and their style, unique.

What is your quilt design process?

If I am working on a sampler style quilt, I try to figure out a theme or certain block (or set of blocks) that I would like to use in order to incorporate all skill levels and techniques. Once I have sketched out ideas on scratch paper I move to Electric Quilt 7 to help in figuring out the design math. Then I’ll start on the sample project by figuring out the color way I want to use. At this point a LOT of sticky notes get used in labeling fabric cuts, making pattern notes, cutting suggestions/revisions, square up points, pressing directions. Sticky Notes are a staple in my studio and are all over the place! Once I have the sample created and the rough directions figured out, I write the actual pattern. Depending on the project I will make test blocks or another whole quilt to make sure everything works out as planned.

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“Triangle Sampler” by Scott. Photo courtesy of 4th & Main Designs Facebook.

Any sage words of advice for aspiring quilt designers?

Surround yourself with a great group of mentors and use them!  Use them as a sounding board for ideas, ask them for advice, and have some who are willing to test and/or proof directions for you. I am blessed to have a diverse group that I count on for help from new quilters to advanced quilters, family members, close friends and even some who aren’t quilters. Everyone has a different way of looking at things! You never know what idea could be helpful!

If you can’t get enough of Scott (we certainly love him!) check out our quick video with Scott talking about his new quilt, Chop Suey, found in our magazine!

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Scrap Quilt Ideas: Chop Suey in Batiks

Quiltmaker’s Scrap Squad is a small select group of readers who make scrap quilts from QM patterns. We share their creations on Quilty Pleasures to inspire you to make scrappy quilts from the fabrics you already own. Doesn’t that sound like fun?

QM scrap squadB3 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Chop Suey in Batiks

Today’s quilt is from Quiltmaker’s brand new May/June issue, on newsstands now. You can also get it directly from us in print or digital format.

QMMP 150600 cover 500 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Chop Suey in Batiks

Quiltmaker May/June 2015

Today’s featured quilt is Chop Suey, designed and made by Scott Flanagan from Fremont, Nebraska. It’s one of three designs by male quilters in this issue. Scott’s quilt, below, is made with Bali Batiks from Hoffman California Fabrics.

QMMP 150600 CHOP 506flat Scrap Quilt Ideas: Chop Suey in Batiks

Chop Suey, designed and made by Scott Flanagan, Quiltmaker May/June ’15. Fabric: Bali Batiks from Hoffman California Fabrics.

Julie Huffman from Lenore, Idaho created today’s colorful version of Chop Suey. You’ll hear from Julie in her own words below.

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Juliecropped Scrap Quilt Ideas: Chop Suey in Batiks

Julie Huffman

For my second Scrap Squad project I was given the pattern Chop Suey. I was attracted to the pattern by the strong graphic lines, yet they had an appearance of being a bit random. The pattern was labeled pre-cut friendly and I didn’t think twice. I wanted to use batiks. Over time I have cut my scraps into usable pieces for projects, so I went straight to these.

fabrics resized Scrap Quilt Ideas: Chop Suey in Batiks

Drawers of my own pre-cut batiks

I stayed with the pattern dimensions and the number of blocks and started pulling strips and 5″ squares in the brighter tones. I did not realize how many different fabrics I had crammed in the drawers and soon decided that I would try to use each piece only once.

I laid the fabrics out to make sure I didn’t have duplicates and kept counting until I came up with 105 batiks. Some of the fabrics are very close to each other but different. The strips are not all full width strips, but if they were at least 10″ long, I put them in the strip box.

fabric resized Scrap Quilt Ideas: Chop Suey in Batiks

35 squares and 70 – 2 1/2″ strips

I had a 4-yard piece of pale blue batik, exactly what the pattern listed for background. After cutting all the pieces, I assembled the blocks randomly and put them on the design wall to get a balance of color before sewing the rows together.

I knew I didn’t want to do a solid border so I went through the leftover strips looking for some that had at least 5″ of length left. The border has duplicates, and not all fabrics from the center of the quilt are used. I randomly sewed the strips together until I got to the correct border length. I used background to fill in the corners.

Hint: When a top is finished and before it is quilted, I recommend straight stitching around the edge of the top to stabilize it and to keep the seams from popping. I stitch at a very scant 1/4″ to stay inside the binding seam line.

For backing I went to my collection of multicolored batiks and pulled out some that I really couldn’t picture using or that hadn’t worked for other projects. After figuring out a size for the backing, I used my tile floor as a guide and laid the pieces out until I roughly had the right size, and then I assembled the back. I did have to insert one strip to make it wide enough.

backing resized Scrap Quilt Ideas: Chop Suey in Batiks

Backing after the quilt was quilted, showing a bit of the scrappy binding

I chose to do a random all-over design using my machine with a slightly larger throat area. I had to try to remember to change directions on my swirls when I got to the halfway point and turned the quilt. With all the straight lines in the quilt top, I wanted to add some interest with the quilting. I tried to do wavy lines that increased and decreased in size and then I went back between each set of lines to add the “puddles.”

quilting resized Scrap Quilt Ideas: Chop Suey in Batiks

Sample of quilting with gray thread

I went back to the batik strip drawer and pulled out pieces to make a binding using many different colors. Here is the finished quilt.

finished quilt resized Scrap Quilt Ideas: Chop Suey in Batiks

My version of Chop Suey. Now I need a clever name for the quilt!

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Get the 2.5″ Carnivale Strip Collection from Keepsake Quilting: Perfect for this quilt!

carnivalestrips Scrap Quilt Ideas: Chop Suey in Batiks

2.5″ Carnivale Strip Collection is perfect to make Julie’s version of Chop Suey!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt, Part 2

Are you ready for Part 2 of the Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt by Debbie Caffrey? Here we go!

Part 1 of Walk in the Park Mystery appeared in our March/April 2015 issue and included the materials list for the entire quilt, cutting for part 1 and instructions for sections 1–3.

QMMP 150200 cover 200 Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt, Part 2

 

Part 2 of Walk in the Park Mystery appears in our May/June 2015 issue and includes instructions to make block X and sections 4 and 5. We’ll show you how the block and sections are put together here, but please refer to the issue for patch sizes and details.

QMMP 150600 cover 500 Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt, Part 2

Quiltmaker May/June 2015

We are offering Mystery Quilt kits in 3 different colorways. All three of these kits are available on our shop site. Whether you are using your own fabrics or one of our three fabulous kits, I hope you have enjoyed sewing along with us!

Blue Lagoon features Ashton Road by Valorie Wells and Kona Cotton Solids from Robert Kaufman.

Blue Lagoon colorway2 Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt, Part 2

 

Holiday Magic features Mistletoe Lane by Moda Fabrics.

Christmas colorway Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt, Part 2

 

Gemstones features Artisan Spirit Good Vibrations Mysteria and Toscana by Northcott.

gemstones colorway1 Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt, Part 2

 

 

In Part 2, we use some of the sections that we made in Part 1. To make block X, join 4 section 1’s, 3 section 2’s, 1 section 3 and an A as shown. Notice how the parts are sewn in diagonal rows and which direction to press the seam allowances. If you press correctly, the seams will nestle when you sew the diagonal rows together. This block will measure 12-1/2″ x 12-1/2″. (It will measure 12″ x 12″ finished–when it’s sewn into the quilt.)

BlockX Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt, Part 2

To make section 4, you’ll need to join the patches as shown. Again, notice how the seam allowances are pressed so that the seams will nestle when sewn together. This section will measure 6-1/2″ x 6-1/2″ (6″ x 6″ finished).

Section4 Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt, Part 2

Next we need to make some Four Patches. To start, we’ll make some bands. Join the strips as shown to make a band. Make 5 bands. Crosscut the bands in 2″ increments to make 96 units.

BandUnit Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt, Part 2

Sew 2 units together as shown to make a Four Patch. Make 48 Four Patches. These will measure 3-1/2″ x 3-1/2″ (3″ x 3″ finished).

FourPatch Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt, Part 2

To make section 5, join 2 Four Patches and 2 F’s as shown. Make 24 section 5′s. These sections should measure 6-1/2″ x 6-1/2″ (6″ x 6″ finished).

Section5 Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt, Part 2

And there you go! You are well on your way to completing your mystery quilt. Only 2 more parts to go to reveal the complete quilt!

Here are the complete block and sections for the Blue Lagoon colorway.

BlueLagoonPt2 Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt, Part 2

The Holiday Magic block and sections are so festive!

HolidayMagicPt2 Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt, Part 2

The Gemstones block and sections are just stunning.

GemstonesPt2 Walk in the Park Mystery Quilt, Part 2

We’d love to have you quilt along with us on this mystery journey! Follow along here on our blog, or follow along on our YouTube channel. Gather your quilty friends and have a mystery party!

Look for Part 3 in Quiltmaker’s July/August 2015 issue. Until then, enjoy our video tutorial on Part 2 of the Mystery quilt!

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