Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa’s Batik Spinning Stars

Louisacropped copy 218x300 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

Louisa Robertson is from Merritt, British Columbia in Canada.

By Louisa Robertson

My final quilt for Scrap Squad is based on Spinning Stars by Kate Colleran, the cover quilt of Quiltmaker’s Jan/Feb issue.

This looks like my kind of quilt—the block has interesting piecing and a strong diagonal line to create secondary designs.

The small star in the corner of each block is a vital part of this pattern. However, after the quilts I’ve done in the last year I could not summon up any enthusiasm for more triangle corners or Flying Geese, so  I turned to Electric Quilt design software, looking for an alternative.

QMMP 150200 cover 500 231x300 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

Quiltmaker Jan/Feb ’15 is on newsstands now or at quiltandsewshop.com.

There I found another block, the Lemoyne Star, that could be made the same size and would cut easily from strips, using diamonds instead of triangles for the star points.

Lemoyne Star Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

Lemoyne Star block made of diamonds and triangle

Pinwheel star Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

Pinwheel Star — made of triangles and flying geese units

 

 

 

 

 

A selection of plaid fabrics was near at hand. I cut pieces and made a sample star.

fabrics plaids 300x243 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

Assorted plaids

Diamonds and the smaller triangles are cut from 1.75″ strips. The larger triangles are cut from 2.25″ strips.

star pieces quarter block Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

Here are the pieces for one block, stacked and ready for sewing.

As I stitched, I finger-pressed all seams clockwise from the centre.  (I have found that small blocks are more accurate if I can resist the urge to reach for the iron until after the block is completely assembled.)

star back unpressed Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

The back of the completed block shows that the seams interlock nicely and the joining seams between the segments of the block are pressed open.

star block pressed 300x286 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

The completed block looks much better after a good pressing. And the points ALMOST meet perfectly at the centre. Not bad.

 

I liked the block, but the plaids did not inspire me. Digging deeper into stash I found some beautiful batiks, including a set of pieces in several shades of blue that would be great for this project.

fabrics2 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

Fabrics under consideration

I paired warm colours – golds, yellows, oranges – with the blues to make the stars, adding assorted lights for backgrounds (most, but not all of them, batiks). Dark blues and greens would be used for the triangles on the sides of the diagonal band sections.

I decided to make a small quilt using only twelve blocks.  The stars were made quickly and I turned to the diagonal sections.

I was working with scraps which is always less efficient than starting with yardage, but I was still able to use some of the strip-piecing methods described in the instructions. I made short strip sets using 2.5″ strips and cut segments from these.

strip sets Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

Short strip sets using 2 1/2″ strips.

batik strips 2s and 3s Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

Assorted 2-square and 3-square units cut from strip sets. Aren’t they pretty lined up on the wall?

stacks of blocks components Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

Sections of the diagonal band ready to be joined together

block sections Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

Block sections are made. Triangles will be added to finish the block.

Once the twelve blocks were made it was time to play with them on the wall.  I soon discovered that there are many ways of putting these together.  Here are a couple of the layouts that I considered.

setting 1 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

This layout was one of my favourites.

setting 2 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

I liked this zigzag setting, too.

I showed my blocks to friends at a sewing day. We tried several versions, and then someone turned two corner blocks by 90 degrees and agreed that we had found the winning combination.

The border was a good place to use my favourite “dancing triangles.”  This pattern repeats the triangles and fabrics from the blocks. I had set aside enough of one of the blue batiks to make the final border.

border details Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

I quilted with a swirly bubble edge-to-edge pattern using a variegated thread that repeated the blues and golds from the fabrics.

spinning stars2 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

Batik Spinning Stars is 48″ x 60″

The Batik Spinning Stars quilt and my year as a member of Scrap Squad are both complete. I have half a dozen lovely quilts and innumerable wonderful memories of my time as part of this team.

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Has Louisa inspired you toward a quilt of batiks? Shop our selection of fabulous colors!

2770 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars      Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars     Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisas Batik Spinning Stars

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New Year’s Mystery Quilt: Part 3

Today I have the third step in QM’s New Year’s Mystery Quilt called Auld Lang Stitches.

NewYearsMystery 300 New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 3

Cutting:

White Tone-on-Tone
96 squares (B) 2″ x 2″

Sewing:
Round up the unit 1′s and unit 3′s you set aside earlier.

Unit5 New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 3
Sew 2 unit 1’s together as shown to make a unit 5. Be sure they are oriented as shown above. Make 96 unit 5’s.

Unit6 New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 3
Sew a white B and a unit 3 together as shown to make a unit 6. Be sure they are oriented as shown above. Make 96 unit 6’s.

Printer-friendly pdf

*     *     *     *     *

I’d be interested in hearing how it’s going so far. Are you making all of the units in a step before moving to the next one, or are you making just a few of each? Either way is fine. It’s always interesting to hear about the approaches different quilters take. Please leave a comment and let me know!

Next clue: Thursday, Jan. 22.

QMATSD3 New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 3   QMATSL1 New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 3   QMATSM2 New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 3

Need to supplement your scrap stash? We have bundles of Lights, Mediums or Darks to get you going, Bonnie Hunter-style!

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No More Backaches: An Ergonomic Approach to Quilting

Quilting can be an enormously rewarding craft, but it can also take its toll on the body. Long hours of repetitive movements rightfully demand our thoughtfulness and attention.

sore 271x300 No More Backaches: An Ergonomic Approach to QuiltingLearn more in our upcoming webinar from presenter and personal trainer Michael Engman, Jan. 19 at 8 pm EST. He’ll provide a fresh and informative look at the quilting process and the ways that it can affect our health.

ergonomics No More Backaches: An Ergonomic Approach to Quilting

Michael shows you how mindful movement in a well-designed workspace not only reduces the negative impact of your activity on your body, it improves efficiency, output and attitude. Perhaps most importantly, it enhances your connection with your own body and your work.

In this web seminar you will learn:

  • The fundamentals of ergonomics and comfort
  • How quality movement can keep you quilting longer
  • Tips to avoid common injuries associated with quilting
  • How to work around existing pain, not through it
  • Gentle stretches for hands, wrists, shoulders, back, and neck
  • How to effectively customize your workspace to fit your needs
  • How to apply your knowledge of quilting ergonomics to any situation

Can’t make the live event (Jan. 19, 8 pm)? Don’t worry! Your registration comes with access to the archived version of the program and the materials for one year. You do not have to attend the live event to get a recording of the presentation. You will receive a copy of the recorded presentation in an email that goes out within a week after the live event.

sewingmachine2 No More Backaches: An Ergonomic Approach to Quilting

Presenter Bio
Michael Engman is a certified personal trainer, orthopedic exercise specialist, and avid health enthusiast. The principles of kinesiology and ergonomics are central to his work as a fitness educator and wellness coach. Michael leads an active lifestyle in Colorado involving mountain climbing, martial arts, and trail running with his dog.

Register now for No More Backaches: An Ergonomic Approach to Quilting.

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QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

I hope you’ve started making or at least thinking about your Bow Tie blocks for QM’s Bitty Blocks in January.

BittyBlockLogo 300px1 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider
I wanted to share a few things for you to think about. Here’s the Bow Tie quilt block we’re making.

bittyblocks10 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

QM Bitty Block #1 is a simple Bow Tie block.

1. You’ll want to consider your backgrounds carefully. I was surprised when I put my first batch up on the design wall. The background was really busy!

bittyblocks19 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

Consider backgrounds carefully.

You can see that I was able to calm it down by adding another background fabric that was less busy.

bittyblocks110 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

Add some background fabrics which are less busy.

2. Another thing to consider is the scale of the fabric. These are tiny blocks, just 3″ x 3″, so small to medium scale is best. Here are examples of good fabrics to use. You’ll want small to medium scale prints and tone-on-tones.

bittyblocks122 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

Good fabrics to use include small to medium scale prints and tone-on-tones.

These large scale fabrics wouldn’t be as good for these small blocks.

bittyblocks123 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

Large scale prints won’t work as well in Bitty Blocks.

3. Another option to think about: You can use a dark fabric for the A patches, and use something lighter for the Bow Tie (B patches), like this.

bittyblocks111 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

I used dark for the A patches and something lighter for the B’s.

Whether you go with light Bow Ties or dark Bow Ties, you’ll probably want to keep the values in the same places for all of them. They look a little weird if you mix them up.

bittyblocks120 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

Things get a little weird when you combine blocks with the values reversed.

You could certainly make two rows of Bow Ties, using light backgrounds for one row and dark backgrounds for the other.

4. Another lesson I want to help you learn is that value is relative. In the block below, I’ve used the turquoise fabric as the dark.

bittyblocks112 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

Turquoise used as the dark fabric

And below, I’ve used the turquoise fabric as the light.

bittyblocks118 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

Turquoise used as the light fabric

Here are the two blocks side by side.

bittyblocks113 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

Blocks side by side: turquoise is the light or is the dark, depending on what you pair it with.

The turquoise can function as the dark or as the light. It all depends on what you pair it with.

bittyblocks119 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

A few renegade blocks will add vibrance to your quilt.

In the row above, I added the “renegade” block with the turquoise background. A few of these can be sprinkled into your rows with great effect. Be brave and give it a try. I promise your quilts will be more lively.

5. You might consider making some of your Bow Ties scrappy.

bittyblocks115 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

Make your Bow Ties scrappy. Just keep the values fairly close so the Bow Tie shows up.

This is a sure-fire way to make more interesting quilts. In the block above, I kept the red values fairly close. One is hot pink and one is very orange, but they all work together because they read as one value. The background A patches are two different pale greens. Once you put it into the row…

bittyblocks116 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

The scrappy red block fits right in!

…it fits right in!

Really good news:

It took me all of 15 minutes to make my first six Bow Tie blocks.

They sew up in a snap! I couldn’t resist seeing what they looked like in a ring.

bittyblocks117 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

Oh my! I feel a scrap quilt coming on!

Oh my! I feel a scrap quilt coming on!

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Help us spread the word: #qmbittyblocks

Find the complete instructions for January’s Bitty Blocks.

Look for a new Bitty Block on the first Monday of each month!

BittyBlockLogo 300px1 QM Bitty Blocks: Things to Consider

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If You Love Antique Quilts…If You Need Quilt Ideas…

If you love antique quilts like I do, you may want to take advantage of our upcoming web seminar from veteran quilt collector Bill Volckening of New York Beauty fame.

Quilt Collecting 101: 250 Years of American Quilts is for anyone who has ever wondered about collecting quilts, and for anyone who’d enjoy an hour of stunning quilty eye candy with a history lesson to boot.

willywonky If You Love Antique Quilts...If You Need Quilt Ideas...

Please join us for this web seminar, Quilt Collecting 101: 250 Years of American Quilts.

I discovered Bill, a teddy bear of a man, quite by accident several years ago. His blog address (Willy Wonky Quilts) piqued my interest, and after just a few clicks I could see that he was up to very very interesting work—collecting New York Beauty quilts, among others.

 If You Love Antique Quilts...If You Need Quilt Ideas...

A pieced quilt from South Carolina, made around 1870 by Florence Shealy of Saluda County, is part of Bill’s collection.

Bill has been collecting quilts for 25 years, and his collection includes more than 250 quilts made between 1760 and the present day. Many of the New York Beauty quilts are of stunning intricacy. I’ve seen some of them on exhibit, and they take your breath away.

Screen%2BShot%2B2014 08 20%2Bat%2B8.32.45%2BAM If You Love Antique Quilts...If You Need Quilt Ideas...

There are other quilts, too, and I’m sure we’ll be treated to some of those during the web seminar. I’m so anxious to learn from Bill and his quilts. (See more quilts on The Volckening Collection Facebook page.)

Many old quilts are surprisingly modern. They can be rich with ideas and inspiration for today’s quilters. Bill will share some of the most outstanding and unusual examples from his collection, and will talk about what today’s quilters can glean from quilt history.

 If You Love Antique Quilts...If You Need Quilt Ideas...

This is one of Bill’s polyester quilts from the 1970s.

Get a taste of what Bill Volckening is about on his blog entitled Wonkyworld. One of his other interesting collections is 1970′s quilts, many of which are made from polyester double knit. Take time to browse his blog and get inspired.

Have I aroused your interest? I hope so. Register for the web seminar now, just $19.99. (If you can’t make the live event, watch any time afterwards at your convenience.)

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New Year’s Mystery Quilt: Answering Your Questions

I wanted to take a minute to answer some of the questions that are popping up regarding Auld Lang Stitches, QM’s New Year’s Mystery Quilt.

NewYearsMystery 300 New Years Mystery Quilt: Answering Your Questions
1. Yardage: The yardage has been checked, double checked and checked again. It is correct. This is a quilt with lots of pieces and lots of piecing, so it takes a lot of fabric.

2. Alternate sizes: At this time we are giving the quilt in one size only (72″ x 96″, which under QM guidelines, makes it a twin). After the complete quilt is revealed, we’ll offer yardage and the number of blocks to make for other sizes.

3. Skill level: This quilt is rated E for easy.

4. Frequency: The clues are given weekly Jan. 1 to Feb. 19. That means eight parts.

5. Online location: The clues are given here on Quilty Pleasures. We promote the mystery on Facebook but nothing else happens there. You’re here, so you’re good.

6: Assorted complaints: I’m always puzzled when people have a little breakdown saying they don’t want to participate because of X, Y or Z. We know that this project will appeal to some people and not to others. That’s totally okay. If you don’t care to make this quilt, it’s fine not to make it. There are so many designs available—you’re sure to find one that you love. How about checking out our free Project Linus patterns?

We wish you Happy Quilting Always!

*     *     *     *     *

Need to play catch-up on the New Year’s Mystery Quilt?
Introductory post
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3 posts at 00:01 AM on Thursday, 1/15/15

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Butterfly Trellis by Margaret Kennedy

Margaretcropped copy 150x150 Butterfly Trellis by Margaret KennedyBy Margaret Kennedy

So here we are, with the reveal of my final quilt as a member of QM’s Scrap Squad for 2014. And what a busy year it has been!

My quilt, Butterfly Trellis, is based on Silver Lining by Tammy Silvers from QM’s Jan/Feb issue. I liked this pattern because of the large open snowball block centers, which offer the ability to showcase a large scale print. One could also showcase special blocks (perhaps like a sampler), machine or hand embroidery, or applique.

Because I wanted to showcase these blocks, I changed the pattern to have complete snowball blocks rather than halves on the sides:

MK6 01 Butterfly Trellis by Margaret Kennedy

Revised layout of Silver Lining quilt for full Snowball blocks

One of my favorite finds at the Houston International Quilt Festival this year was some stencils by Edyta Sitar of Laundry Basket quilts.

MK6 02 Butterfly Trellis by Margaret Kennedy

Butterfly stencils by Laundry Basket Quilts

Of course, I decided to put butterfly appliques on my snowball blocks using the larger stencil. I made a paper mock-up to see how it would fit on the blocks. It overlapped the corners, which I decided was okay. Oh, and did I mention, I wanted COLOR in my quilt?

MK6 03 Butterfly Trellis by Margaret Kennedy

Checking fit on the quilt block

And so I proceeded to make the snowball blocks, and cut and fuse the butterfly appliques.  I used Kaffe Fassett Collective fabrics and a few batiks. I did a little fussy cutting as well! The butterflies have yellow upper wings, and pink-red lower wings, except for one renegade that is reversed.

MK6 04 Butterfly Trellis by Margaret Kennedy

Snowball blocks with butterfly appliques

I stitched the edges of the applique down with a narrow zigzag using invisible thread.

MK6 05 Butterfly Trellis by Margaret Kennedy

Stitching the edge of the fused appliques with invisible thread

The antennae were added with a Pigma Micron pen using the stencil:

MK6 06 Butterfly Trellis by Margaret Kennedy

Adding details with Pigma Micron pen

I cut the pieces for the alternate blocks using my Accuquilt die-cutting system. Here they are, along with my work plan for the quilt.

MK6 07 Butterfly Trellis by Margaret Kennedy

Die cut pieces for alternate blocks

I made all the blocks and sewed them in the diagonal setting. I added a blue inner border, a green middle border, and a pink outer border.

I embroidered my label and pieced it into the quilt backing. That way I know it is secure and I don’t have any hand work after the quilting is done.

MK6 08 Butterfly Trellis by Margaret Kennedy

Embroidered quilt label set into the quilt backing

 

For quilting, I used an overall leafy design in lime green.

MK6 09 Butterfly Trellis by Margaret Kennedy

Quilting thread: Lime Green is a Neutral!

I did a “magic binding” in pink with a green accent. This technique is completely machine stitched.

MK6 10 Butterfly Trellis by Margaret Kennedy

“Magic Binding” ready to apply

Here’s the final product. Repeating the pinks I used in the alternate blocks in the border gave a sense of transparency and the feeling of a trellis. Hence, the quilt was christened “Butterfly Trellis”:

MK6 11 Butterfly Trellis by Margaret Kennedy

“Butterfly Trellis” by Margaret Kennedy, based on “Silver Lining” by Tammy Silvers for Quiltmaker

And my blog post would not be complete without a glamour shot:

MK6 12 Butterfly Trellis by Margaret Kennedy

Butterfly Trellis in her glamour shot!

I have had a wonderful time being a member of Quiltmaker’s Scrap Squad for 2014. Thanks for your interest and support throughout the year!

MK6 13 Butterfly Trellis by Margaret Kennedy

Margaret Kennedy – Quiltmaker’s Scrap Squad 2014

 

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QM’s New Year’s Mystery Quilt: Part 2

Welcome back to Quiltmaker’s New Year’s Mystery Quilt. This is Part 2 of Auld Lang Stitches. If you missed them, find the introductory post with yardage, and Part 1.

NewYearsMystery 300 QMs New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 2

Part 2

(Get a printer-friendly version of Part 2.)

Cutting:

White Tone-on-Tone
144 squares (A) 2 3/8″ x 2 3/8″

Red Tone-on-Tone
144 squares (A) 2 3/8″ x 2 3/8″

Sewing:

• Refer to the “Triangle-Squares” technique.* Pair the white A’s and red A’s to make 288 unit 3’s. Be sure each unit 3 measures 2″ x 2″.

Unit3 QMs New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 2

• Sew 2 unit 3′s together as shown to make a unit 4. Make 96 unit 4′s. Be sure they are oriented as shown below.

Unit4 QMs New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 2

• Set the remaining unit 3′s aside.

*Triangle-Squares Technique

With the right sides together and the lighter fabric on top, pair one square of each color that makes the unit. On the lighter patch, draw a diagonal line from corner to corner. Stitch 1/4″ out from both sides of the line. Cut apart on the marked line. With the darker fabric up, open out the top patch and press the unit. A pair of squares will yield 2 units.

 QMs New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 2

We’ll post Clue #3 on Thursday, Jan. 15. You’re invited to post photos of your progress on our Facebook page, or email them to us using editor@quiltmaker.com.

I hope your new year is off to a great start!

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QM Bitty Blocks: Adorable Small Designs

#qmbittyblocks

A while back we brainstormed for an engaging, low stress project we could get QM’s readers on board with, and that’s how QM’s Bitty Blocks were born.

BittyBlockLogo 506px1 QM Bitty Blocks: Adorable Small Designs
We are so excited about this new free quilt blocks project! Here’s how it will work. On the first Monday of each month during 2015, we’ll present you with a Bitty Block. Most will be 3″ or 4″ square and all will be easy to make. They’ll be hashtagged as #qmbittyblocks.

bittyblocks121 QM Bitty Blocks: Adorable Small Designs

QM Bitty Blocks: Free quilt block patterns monthly during 2015

The idea will be to make Bitty Blocks during the month and then sew them together into a row. We’ll give you more specific instructions as we go along, but the general idea will be to create an amazing throw-size row quilt made from lots of Bitty Blocks.

As far as fabric, you can do anything you’d like, but we highly recommend a scrappy approach. The more the merrier!

We’re also going to teach you many new tricks, especially if you’re an early quilter. We’ll have quilt video tutorials to help you with things like triangle-squares, pressing, fabric considerations and more during the year. We’ll have photo tutorials, too. I think you’ll learn a lot.

Now let’s get to our first QM Bitty Block. January’s block is a little 3″ Bow Tie. (Printer friendly version here.)

bittyblocks10 QM Bitty Blocks: Adorable Small Designs

QM Bitty Block #1 is a simple Bow Tie block.

Each Bow Tie takes two fabrics. Just be sure there is enough contrast between them. In other words, you should be able to clearly see a difference in the two. One should be lighter and the other should be darker.

bittyblocks11 QM Bitty Blocks: Adorable Small Designs

Each Bow Tie block uses these 6 patches.

You can choose just one fabric for all of the background patches, or you can mix it up. It’s more fun to mix it up! Each Bow Tie takes these patches:

Bow Tie fabric: 2 squares (A) 2″ x 2″ and 2 squares (B) 1 1/4″ x 1 1/4″
Background fabric: 2 squares (A) 2″ x 2″

I know what you’re thinking. “Eeek! Those B patches are frighteningly small!” But I’m here to tell you that it’s no more difficult to sew across a tiny patch than it is to sew across a large patch. Trust me.

bittyblocks12 QM Bitty Blocks: Adorable Small Designs

Place a B patch on the corner of an A patch, right sides together.

We’re going to use Stitch & Flip, and here’s how it’s done. Place a B patch on the corner of an A patch of background fabric as shown above. (I drew red lines at the edges of B because I wasn’t sure the B patch would show up.) You’re going to sew on that diagonal red line.

bittyblocks13 QM Bitty Blocks: Adorable Small Designs

Sew on the diagonal as shown; you can mark the diagonal or you can just eyeball it.

You can either mark it as shown, or you can eyeball it without marking. I always mark but these patches are so tiny, I was able to eyeball it easily. Try it and see! I used dark thread for visibility in the photos, but you’ll want to use neutral thread.

bittyblocks14 QM Bitty Blocks: Adorable Small Designs

Trim away just the B patch, leaving a 1/4″ seam allowance.

Now trim away just the B patch as shown above, leaving a 1/4″ seam allowance.

bittyblocks15 QM Bitty Blocks: Adorable Small Designs

Press the B patches open as shown.

Press the B patches open as shown. Notice that on the top sample, the blue doesn’t totally cover the background. That is why you don’t cut the background away. It serves as a benchmark for you. When you sew the patches together going forward, use the edge of the background patch as your standard.

Please see this related post for tips on how to Stitch & Flip successfully. I hated Stitch & Flip until I learned how to make it work.

bittyblocks16 QM Bitty Blocks: Adorable Small Designs

Arrange the patches like this.

Arrange the patches as shown above. Join them in pairs.

bittyblocks17 QM Bitty Blocks: Adorable Small Designs

Join the patches in pairs.

Sew the pairs together as shown below.

bittyblocks18 QM Bitty Blocks: Adorable Small Designs

Sew the pairs together.

Measure your block and be sure it is 3 1/2″ x 3 1/2″. If not, adjust accordingly.

During January (or whenever you get to it!), make 16 Bow Tie blocks. We’re shooting for a nice throw-size quilt, and you’ll be off to a great start! If you love making these, go ahead and make another row of them.

Printer friendly version of January’s Bow Tie block

Coming 1/12/15: QM Bitty Blocks, Things to Consider: Helpful tips on choosing fabrics and more.

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Please help us spread the word about #qmbittyblocks. Use the hashtag, share this post on social media and tell your friends. Maybe your small group would like to make Bitty Blocks together. Whatever you do, we’d love to hear about it: editor@quiltmaker.com.

February’s Bitty Block goes up Monday, Feb. 2. Ready, set, sew!

BittyBlockLogo 300px1 QM Bitty Blocks: Adorable Small Designs

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Quiltmaker’s New Year’s Mystery Quilt: Part 1

Happy New Year!

And welcome to

Quiltmaker’s New Year’s Mystery Quilt

NewYearsMystery 300 Quiltmakers New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 1

If you haven’t already, please see our introductory post with yardage and color ideas. We’ve named this quilt Auld Lang Stitches (clever title courtesy of Creative Editor Paula Stoddard).

Today we begin with Part 1. We’ve sprinkled the cutting into several of the early steps, to make the whole process more fun. For a printable PDF of Part 1, click here.

Cutting:

White Tone-on-Tone
144 squares (A) 2 3/8″ x 2 3/8″
Blue Tone-on-Tone
144 squares (A) 2 3/8″ x 2 3/8″
96 squares (B) 2″ x 2″

Sewing:

• Refer to the “Triangle-Squares” technique.* Pair the white A’s and blue A’s to make 288 unit 1’s. Be sure each unit 1 measures 2″ x 2″.

Unit1 Quiltmakers New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 1

• Sew a blue B to a unit 1 as shown to make a unit 2. Make 96 unit 2’s. Be sure each unit 2 measures 2″ x 3 1/2″.

 

Unit2 Quiltmakers New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 1

• Set the remaining unit 1’s aside.

*     *     *     *     *

*Triangle-Squares Technique

 Quiltmakers New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 1

With the right sides together and the lighter fabric on top, pair one square of each color that makes the unit. On the lighter patch, draw a diagonal line from corner to corner. Stitch 1/4″ out from both sides of the line. Cut apart on the marked line. With the darker fabric up, open out the top patch and press the unit. A pair of squares will yield 2 units.

 *     *     *     *     *

I really hope you’ll have a good time making Auld Lang Stitches! I’m making a scrappy version using red-violets and yellow-greens, plus black prints in place of the white.

dianesmysteryfabrics Quiltmakers New Years Mystery Quilt: Part 1

These are the fabrics I’ll be using for my version of Auld Lang Stitches.

You’re invited to post photos of your progress on our Facebook page, or email them to us using editor@quiltmaker.com. We can’t wait to see what you come up with!

 

Posted in Freebies, Quilty Lifestyle | Tagged , , | 47 Comments