Scrap Quilt Ideas: Nadia’s “A Few Zags”

QM scrap squadB3 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Nadias A Few Zags

Quilts from the Scrap Squad continue today with another scrappy rendition of a design in Quiltmaker’s May/June issue, on newsstands now. To be sure you never miss an issue, subscribe easily.

QMMP 140600 cover 350 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Nadias A Few Zags

The Quiltmaker Scrap Squad is a select group of six QM readers who take one pattern from each issue and make scrappy versions of it to inspire others. You can see slideshows of past Scrap Squad projects.

 

QM MountainMorning Hoff Scrap Quilt Ideas: Nadias A Few Zags

Mountain Morning is the featured quilt from this issue. It was designed by Jocelyn Ueng who is with It’s Sew Emma, and made in Bali Batiks from preferred partners Hoffman California Fabrics.

scrapsquad nadia2 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Nadias A Few Zags

Today’s featured quilt is by Nadia Wilson from Port Hardy, British Columbia. You’ll hear about her process in her own words below.

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As soon as I saw the pattern for my second Scrap Squad assignment I knew I wanted to make a chevron quilt.

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Beautiful jewel tones!

I decided to use my collection of Cantik Batiks.

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Cantik Batiks

I wanted the rich jewel tones to be set against a dark background. Early on I had a clear vision for this quilt!

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Pencil drawing

I needed to change up the original pattern because I had a hard time visualizing my chevrons with the dark/light strip sets between the mountains. I decided to remove them completely and go for a more solid-looking background.

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Deciding on the fabric layout

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Planning the rows

To save time, I used one of my ‘cheater’ rulers to cut out the squares. I try to make some jobs easier on myself!

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ScrapMaster ruler to cut squares

In assembling my rows, I accidentally sewed a whole row of half square triangles to gray fabric on both sides when I meant to sew half gray and half black. What to do??? I didn’t want to waste fabric and spend a lot more time piecing, so I added a different design element to my top. Sometimes accidents actually work out for the better!

My decision now was between making them as diamonds or as elongated rectangles. I opted for the diamonds as I thought these would offset the chevrons nicely. I’m pleased with the results!

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Rectangles?

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Diamonds?

I love piecing! I find it so relaxing and it’s such a nice process. I like to match up my seams as evenly as possible, and when pressing my seams I try to minimize bulk. I think ahead to the quilting stage as I am piecing so I can plan how my seams will fall. Chain piecing saves time and thread!

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Even seams

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Distribute the bulk on seams

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I love chain piecing!

For the quilting, I opted to stitch in the ditch. I absolutely love the fabrics and the brightness of the jewel tones and I did not want the quilting to take away from it. I backed the quilt with a really nice cuddly flannel fabric—this quilt will be ‘oh so soft’ to snuggle under! I used Hobbs 80/20 batting in black, and in keeping with the batik theme, I used a more solid black Cantik Batik fabric for binding.

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Machine quilting on my Bernina

Here is a picture of my completed top lying on a queen size bed. I am really pleased with how it turned out. I love the richness of the Cantik Batik fabrics set against the black and gray background fabrics. The diamond strip adds just enough difference to make the quilt sparkle!

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A Few Zags

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Details of the diamond strip on the gray background

Thanks for looking! Let me know what you think of my interpretation of this lovely quilt.

Happy Quilting,

Nadia

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Getting Frondly

Getting Frondly

 block 100 Getting Frondly

When the editors here at Quiltmaker first mentioned I would have the opportunity to create a quilt block design for Quitmaker’s 100 Blocks vol. 9 I got pretty excited and spent quite a bit of time reviewing the wide variety of designs from previous volumes, considering this is vol. 9 there are A LOT of block designs to look back on.

I am still quite new to the quilting industry yet consider myself pretty crafty in many other art forms and knew I would figure something out. However after looking at the designs from previous volumes, from traditional to modern styles and let alone the many techniques and methods of constructing a quilt block, my mind couldn’t help but come to a halt.

images 1 Getting Frondly

Inspiration: simple tropical plants

After stepping away from all of the research I had done, I came up with a few main design goals for the end product:

  1. Simple Shapes that would be efficient to reproduce considering I would at some point make more than one of this block.
  2. Variety in color and or value to help create depth in the design.
  3. Diverse placement options of design elements.
pieces1 Getting Frondly

My version of simplified leaves from a tropical plant.

I enjoy organic shapes and movement in a composition, and decided to use a nature themed design element, therefore I chose to create a leaf. I found that ferns and tropical plants tend to have leaf structure with the most movement. They are also larger, which meant it could take up a large area of the finished 12 inch block, creating volume in the composition.

draw1 Getting Frondly

Simple leaf shapes.

I did a few sketches of leaf shapes, varying the width and length of each shape to make a simple and natural looking design. I used a well lit window to trace the leaf shapes in reverse. This helped to help keep shapes consistent in my rough sketch.

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Leafs repeated to create movement up the stem.

fabric Getting Frondly

Various blue-green and yellow-green fabrics from P&B Textiles.

After simplifying the design to use only a few different shaped leaves, repeated throughout I chose a variety of green fabrics from P&B Textiles ranging from darker blue-green to brighter yellow-green to create value in the finished layout.

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Stitching practice around the leaf edges and stem.

Placing the leaf onto a warm yellow background complimented the different green values used throughout the design. It worked especially well with the grass green satin stitched stem, highlighting the movement of the complete leaf.

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The finished block.

I am most pleased with the diversity of this blocks design. Even though there are quite a few pieces to one leaf, they are easy to prep, reproduce and resize. Whether using the original block repeated in a quilt top or rescaling the leaf and playing with placement, Getting Frondly would make a wonderful table runner or decorative wall hanging. Not to mention it’s a great scrap busting project, the more diversity in the leaves the better!

 

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The Evolution of a Butterfly Block

Many of my designs for 100 Blocks are inspired by nature. Knowing that 100 Blocks volume 9 would released in May, I decided to go for something springy. I searched for ideas in Google  images.

Butterflies? That says spring! Who couldn’t find inspiration in pictures like these?

Screen shot 2014 05 08 at 2.33.17 PM e1399581563147 The Evolution of a Butterfly BlockI roughed out a butterfly on paper, then I spent a few hours drawing the foundation block in EQ7. When I was happy with its shape and patches, I dropped in fabric colors. The more colors I added, the better I liked it–but I wasn’t 100% satisified with the design below.

butterfly31 300x300 The Evolution of a Butterfly BlockI called my husband over to take a peek and give me some feedback. He said it was the biggest butterfly he had ever seen. I was sorry I asked. I wasn’t about to put a 2″ butterfly in the middle of a 12″ block. Still, something more was needed. Then it hit me–the butterfly needs to look like it’s in motion. I used EQ7′s Serendipity tool to tilt it about 30 degrees. Much better!

butterfly8 300x300 The Evolution of a Butterfly BlockCould I find the right fabrics? (Yes, I’m an incurable batik-aholic.) The oranges, golds, pinks and purples in Minerals by Fresh Batiks for Clothworks fit the bill perfectly.

photo2 e1399584210699 The Evolution of a Butterfly BlockWhen the piecing was finished, I arranged a few heat set crystals on the wings.

photo1 e1399651512608 The Evolution of a Butterfly BlockWith some purple floss, I embroidered the antennae and added a couple of curls on the bottom of the wings for balance. A few more crystals here and there and I had one blinged-out butterfly.

QMMS 140044 FOWLER 300x300 The Evolution of a Butterfly Block

Butterfly-by Block #820 from volume 9

If you like butterflies, here’s an on-point layout filled with them.. I reversed a few so they aren’t all flying in the same direction.

butterfly 300x300 The Evolution of a Butterfly BlockFor a smaller quilt with a single butterfly, here’s simpler layout.

butterfly2 300x300 The Evolution of a Butterfly BlockAfter a long winter season, I’m basking in the longer days of warm sunshine and breathing in the fresh smells after the spring rains. I love watching trees bud and flowers bloom. Isn’t this a wonderful time of year? What are your favorite signs of spring?

 

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Quiltmaker Supports Quilts of Valor Foundation

Quilts of Valor Foundation has a mission to cover all U.S. warriors and combat veterans with healing, comforting Quilts of Valor.

4 Quiltmaker Supports Quilts of Valor Foundation

Quiltmaker’s shop site, Quilt and Sew Shop, and other shop sites owned by our parent company, are hosting a benefit for Quilts of Valor Foundation (QOVF) now through
May 16.

FW QuiltsofValor 403 Quiltmaker Supports Quilts of Valor Foundation

Your purchase will benefit Quilts of Valor Foundation.

During this time, 10% of sales will benefit QOVF. If you’ve been thinking about a kit, book or pattern, now’s the time to get it.

Things you might enjoy from our shop:

QMMS 140044 cover 2005 Quiltmaker Supports Quilts of Valor Foundation

Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Volume 9

Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Volume 9 in print or digital format

 

ambeau Quiltmaker Supports Quilts of Valor Foundation

America the Beautiful digital pattern

America the Beautiful digital pattern (start sewing right away!)

 

501 Quiltmaker Supports Quilts of Valor Foundation

501 Quilting Motifs: A great resource for anyone who wants to finish quilts in style.

The popular 501 Quilting Motifs book from Quiltmaker is a go-to resource for anyone who quilts. Also available as an ebook!

 

regal Quiltmaker Supports Quilts of Valor Foundation

We have convenient kits for Regal Patch, one of the series of QM Patch Pals.

Who can resist the latest Patch Pal, whom we’ve named Regal Patch. We have a convenient kit for the king of the jungle.

 

motifs Quiltmaker Supports Quilts of Valor Foundation

Get hundreds of original quilting ideas in QM’s Quilting Motifs books

Quiltmaker’s ever-popular Quilting Motifs books: Buy as a set or buy them individually.

Remember that shopping now benefits this fine organization!

FW QuiltsofValor 403 Quiltmaker Supports Quilts of Valor Foundation

Support Quilts of Valor Foundation when you shop through May 16.

 

More about Quilts of Valor

Blue Star mom Catherine Roberts began the Quilts of Valor Foundation from her sewing room in Seaford, Delaware. Her son Nathanael’s year-long deployment to Iraq provided the initial inspiration, and her desire to see that returning warriors were welcomed home with the love and gratitude they deserved provided the rest.

10 Quiltmaker Supports Quilts of Valor Foundation

She hit upon the idea that linking quilt-toppers with machine quilters in a national effort could achieve her goal of coverall all returning service men and women touched by war.  These wartime quilts, called Quilts of Valor (QOV’s), would be a tangible reminder of an American’s appreciation and gratitude. Since 2003, QOVF has become a national grassroots community service effort, connecting the home-front with our wounded combat warriors and veterans.

11 Quiltmaker Supports Quilts of Valor Foundation

QOV’s are stitched with love, prayers and healing thoughts. Our troops who have been wounded or touched by war are awarded this tangible token of appreciation that unequivocally says, “Thank you for your service, sacrifice and valor.”

1 Quiltmaker Supports Quilts of Valor Foundation

A Quilt of Valor is a generous lap-sized quilt (minimum of 55 x 65) made by a quilt-topper (the piecer) of quality fabrics and beautifully quilted by a longarmer. After it has been bound, washed, labeled and wrapped in a presentation case, it is ready to be awarded.

3 Quiltmaker Supports Quilts of Valor Foundation

Quilts are awarded at many different levels: they may go to military hospitals where Chaplains award them to service members; there may be presentations of QOV’s to entire service units returning from combat deployments; they may be awarded at VA’s or presented individually.

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No matter how a Quilt of Valor is given, the impact it delivers is unequivocal. As one recipient said “My quilt isn’t another military medal to be placed in a box and sit on my shelf. I was moved to tears.”  – SSgt RC, US Army, Iraq ‘05

7 Quiltmaker Supports Quilts of Valor Foundation

Just how much of an impact has the Quilts of Valor Foundation made? As of this May 2014, there have been over 100,000 quilts awarded to service members/veterans.

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My EQ Boutique: Electronic Block Designs

Getting to Know My EQ Boutique

logo fall My EQ Boutique: Electronic Block Designs

First, a little history:

From the time Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks was just a wild idea, we’ve been thinking about providing many ways for our readers to access the designs. Because different things work for different people.

learningdropshadow My EQ Boutique: Electronic Block Designs       QM21012 My EQ Boutique: Electronic Block Designs         QM20413 My EQ Boutique: Electronic Block Designs

We started with printed magazines.

DPQM21211 My EQ Boutique: Electronic Block Designs

We expanded to downloadable pdfs of the magazines.

CB1148 My EQ Boutique: Electronic Block Designs

We partnered with the folks at Martingale/That Patchwork Place to publish Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Volumes 1 and 2.

MEQB badge3 My EQ Boutique: Electronic Block Designs

And we partnered with The Electric Quilt Company to bring the designs into pattern printing software called My EQ Boutique. This option is perfect if you missed an early volume of 100 Blocks, or if you just want a few blocks from Volumes 1–4.

My EQ Boutique pattern printing software is free with your first purchase. It’s as simple as shop, download and print—in any size you want. All of the 100 Blocks designs were originally 12″ blocks, but with My EQ Boutique, you can print them in any size you like.

DQMKCV1 patLG My EQ Boutique: Electronic Block Designs

Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Volume 1

 

You can purchase block patterns individually or in sets for $29.99.  Sets are more economical but it’s totally up to you. You can buy one, or buy 100. Or anything in between.

Block 25
DQMKCV1025 My EQ Boutique: Electronic Block Designs Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks, Vol 1 – Swedish Log Cabin
Block #25 by Lorraine Olsen
DQMKCV1025
$2.99

Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Volumes 1, 2 and 3 have been available for some time; we’ve recently made Volume 4 available on My EQ Boutique.

DQMKCV4 patLG My EQ Boutique: Electronic Block Designs

Volume 4 is now available.

 

There is much more information on My EQ Boutique’s website detailing how it works, but here are the top five reasons you can benefit from using My EQ Boutique pattern software.

  1. Patterns can be printed in any size, at any time.
  2. You can quickly see a block repeated in a horizontal setting.
  3. Sewing instructions are available for some collections.
  4. Instruction on different sewing techniques is available.
  5. It’s easy. With each purchase, your new patterns add themselves to your Boutique software.
  6. For advanced users, blocks purchased through My EQ Boutique can be imported and used in EQ7.
  7. Try it for free with some of the free blocks available! (Please note: The software requires a Windows operating system. It can be run on a Mac as long as the Mac is running Windows using a virtualization software, such as Parallels.)

Of course Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks sets are not the only thing you’ll find on My EQ Boutique. There are many other great patterns, too. I hope you’ll take a look.

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Scrap Quilt Ideas: Buff’s Mountain Morning

QM scrap squadB3 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Buffs Mountain Morning

Quilts from the Scrap Squad continue today with another scrappy rendition of a design in Quiltmaker’s May/June issue, on newsstands now. To be sure you never miss an issue, subscribe easily.

QMMP 140600 cover 350 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Buffs Mountain Morning

The Quiltmaker Scrap Squad is a select group of six QM readers who take one pattern from each issue and make scrappy versions of it to inspire others. You can see slideshows of past Scrap Squad projects.

 

QM MountainMorning Hoff Scrap Quilt Ideas: Buffs Mountain Morning

Mountain Morning is the featured quilt from this issue. It was designed by Jocelyn Ueng who is with It’s Sew Emma, and made in Bali Batiks from preferred partners Hoffman California Fabrics.

Today’s featured quilt is by Buff Jones, who makes her home in Santa Clara, California. She recently moved there from Minnesota, where her family is finishing up some loose ends.

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You’ll hear Buff’s story in her own words below.

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Chevrons are great fun to make and to admire. And Mountain Morning was lovely—I adore teal, and it was so serene. It was still wavering between Winter and Spring (especially in Minnesota), and I decided that I wanted spring!  So I chose to use a wonderful, colorful, mostly modern floral print instead of the pattern’s white batik, and I built the quilt around the colors in this print.

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I really had to make a legend for this one. I used little colored tape arrows to help me keep track, or the Chevrons would never have become Chevrons.

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I created a legend to help me keep track of which fabrics went where.

After a stash attack and a run to the quilt store, don’t you think the colors are grand? (I may have to buy a new iPhone, because my son’s camera is better than mine.)

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Remember how I said I always sew one block first? Okay, I was just kidding. Seriously, I had some Zen moments (who said hours?!) sewing half square triangles in beautiful colors. Then I pressed them and admired them. Lots and Lots of them. (See the sticky tape arrows?)

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Being who I am, I had many more Zen moments trimming dog ears, one 0f my least favorite things in quilting, although I sincerely love real dog ears, honestly.

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When I laid out the blocks according to the pattern, they didn’t speak to me. They were nice, but, just not, you know, right. (Notice how I have my ruler weighing down the small half square triangles at the top of the photo below? More on defensive quilting later…)

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What say we turn the blocks this way and that, and…NOW, you’re talking!  ”Blooming Chevrons” is born!!!

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Time to sew all those rows together, and, er… I think that Leonidas, Assistant #1, is bored by the process. Or, maybe he really likes it. Sometimes it is hard to tell. Now you know why there are rulers weighing down anything that moves. And lint rollers in abundance.

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When the top was complete, I decided to use just two lengths for the backing and add a “scrap stripe” that mirrored the quilt “bands,” using up my scraps in the process. Voilá!

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Wow, did Margrit Schwanck from Golden State Sewing do an amazing job on the quilting, or what? What a perfect pattern—it looks as beautiful on the back as on the front!

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Blooming Chevrons hung on the wall is okay…

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Blooming Chevrons complete!

But Blooming Chevrons on the bed is a magnet for the quilter’s Assistants!!! (The new addition is Gilgamesh, the blonde tabby.)

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Quilter’s Assistants

 

Long live the Scrap Squad!!!

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Get Quiltmaker‘s May/June issue with the pattern for Mountain Morning in print or digital format.

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Quilt Labels: Whimsical Lettering

Not everyone can draw but almost everyone can write—and that’s what piqued my interest in The Art of Whimsical Lettering by Joanne Sharpe for Interweave/F+W.

whimsical450 Quilt Labels: Whimsical Lettering

The Art of Whimsical Lettering by Joanne Sharpe retails for $24.99.

At first glance you may think the book isn’t related to quiltmaking, but wait! It is! I could hardly contain my excitement when I realized that whimsical lettering is perfect for quilt labels.

whimsical7 Quilt Labels: Whimsical Lettering

I used just one easy technique for starters.

The Art of Whimsical Lettering is for anyone who can physically write.

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Another easy technique from The Art of Whimsical Lettering by Joanne Sharpe

If you can make the alphabet, you can create interesting, artistic and totally unique letters that can be used however you like. For quilters, the first thing that comes to mind is quilt labels, but there are other applications, too.

whimsical9 Quilt Labels: Whimsical Lettering

You can do this! Imagine how creative all your quilt labels can become with whimsical lettering.

You don’t have to be a serious artist to do this, although serious artists will find it fascinating. And everyone will find Joanne’s relaxed teaching style engaging and easy to follow.

whimsical1 Quilt Labels: Whimsical Lettering

My first attempt on paper

I tried one of the simplest ideas in the book, first on paper. This was done with no practice at all—think how great it could look if I practiced! You can see that I was working in a sketchbook but just about anything with substantial paper will do.

whimsical2 Quilt Labels: Whimsical Lettering

My first attempt on fabric, ironed to freezer paper

From there I decided to try it some lettering on fabric. I ironed solid white cotton to freezer paper and worked on a hard surface. I used dual-tip Tulip fabric markers I purchased on Amazon (because I live in a rural area). The word “Ryann” on fabric above is quite large, about 3″ tall.

whimsical4 Quilt Labels: Whimsical Lettering

My first doodle label for a quilt is about 3″ x 3.5″.

I decided to work smaller, more like an actual quilt label would be. I learned some things on this one that’s about 3″ x 3.5″. I’d make the word “great” smaller and make the word “aunt” larger, because it’s more important.

I’m going to reread some of the sections in The Art of Whimsical Lettering to learn how to make a greater variety of letters. And I’m going to practice, practice, practice.

whimsical6 Quilt Labels: Whimsical Lettering

I added fabric strips around the label edges.

I wanted to see how it would look made into a label. I added fabric strips around the edges and made it into a label using my Quick Quilt Label method. If it was for real, it would be ready to add to my quilt.

I have just scratched the surface of what is possible with artistic writing on quilts. I think it would be fun to make a bunch of quilt blocks that are just my whimsically lettered thoughts, or quotes, or favorite verses, filled in and around with artful doodles and decoration.

The piecing between the blocks could accent them or add additional color or be wonky and improvisational or…the  possibilities are endless.

whimsical450 Quilt Labels: Whimsical Lettering

One other important thing about the book: It’s wonderfully affirming for anyone who wants to learn a new art or craft. There’s no room for self-deprecation—take this statement as an example:

“Know that each brave attempt in any stage of a creative learning process is a perfect result in your learning curve.”

Isn’t that empowering?!

I recommend Joanne Sharpe’s The Art of Whimsical Lettering from Interweave/F+W. You’ll find ways to use it for quiltmaking and you’ll stretch your creative boundaries as you explore making beautiful, whimsical letters of all sorts.

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The Tale of a Block: Metro Mod

By Paula Stoddard, QM Associate Editor

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Once upon a time I was eating lunch with my sweet, cute hubby at our favorite Panera restaurant.

lunch The Tale of a Block: Metro Mod

This isn’t lunch at Panera, but it is me with my sweet, cute hubby!

As we were sitting there eating, I noticed the fabric on the bench behind my sweet, cute hubby. Whose name is Dan, by the way.

panera The Tale of a Block: Metro Mod

Fabric on the bench behind my sweet, cute hubby.

I’m not really into the gold look, but I was drawn to the design. It’s kind of hard to be discreet when taking a picture during the busy lunch hour in the middle of a restaurant, but I persevered. All in the name of a possible quilt design. Please tell me I’m not the only one who does this. My husband is pretty sure that I am.

panera block The Tale of a Block: Metro Mod

Block inspiration.

I tucked this photo away for a rainy day to play with, which came about when coming up with a design for Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks, volume 9.

QMMS 140044 STODDARD The Tale of a Block: Metro Mod

Metro Mod

I played with several fabrics from Quilting Treasures, and came up with this fun combination using Metro by Studio 8 for Quilting Treasures. Because this block was inspired by a lunch date at Panera, I wanted to be all creative and name it something like Almond Chicken Salad Surprise or Double Chocolate Chip Heaven, but as you can see, I just couldn’t make that work.

I really like this design – it has so many possibilities. One fun thing I discovered, besides all of the fun things you can do with color to create very different quilt designs, is that you can play with the quadrants of the block – rotating them differently within the block – to create a completely new block that lends itself to a whole new set of possible quilt designs. If you follow along on Quiltmaker’s Block Network, I explore all of the possibilities for this block on a future episode, so you’ll have to stay tuned!

So, please tell me I’m not alone! Where do you find your quilty inspiration?

Quilt happy!

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Today: Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Volume 9

Today’s the day that Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Volume 9 officially appears at quilt shops and newsstands. I hope you’ll pick up a copy wherever you find it.

QMMS 140044 cover 2004 Today: Quiltmakers 100 Blocks Volume 9

You’ll find it most consistently at chain bookstores such as Barnes & Noble and chain fabric stores like Joann. But it will also turn up in grocery stores, pharmacies such as Walgreen’s, variety stores, craft stores and locally owned quilt shops. How well these are stocked and restocked varies widely.

If you can’t find it locally, we have print and digital (instant!) versions.

Vol9 onsalenow socialmedia Today: Quiltmakers 100 Blocks Volume 9All of the blocks finish at 12″. You’ll find piecing, applique, foundations and mixed techniques. Here’s a peek:

QMMS 140044 MACKENZIE Today: Quiltmakers 100 Blocks Volume 9

Half Log Cabin Tulips by Kay Mackenzie

 

QMMS 140044 MERRITT Today: Quiltmakers 100 Blocks Volume 9

Branching Out by Diane Merritt

 

QMMS 140044 LYNCH Today: Quiltmakers 100 Blocks Volume 9

Got Wheels? by Cheryl Lynch

 

QMMS 140044 KRAMER Today: Quiltmakers 100 Blocks Volume 9

American Crossroads by Jo and Kelli Kramer

I hope I’ve enticed you to get your copy today. There are 96 more amazing blocks just waiting to be made into quilts for your family and friends.

QMMS 140044 cover 2005 Today: Quiltmakers 100 Blocks Volume 9

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New QM Webinar: What It Takes to Teach: Quilting and More. Register now for just $19.99 and learn from the best.

 

 

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I’m Sew Happy: Scrap Quilt Block

I’m Sew Happy!

QMMS 140044 HARRIS D Im Sew Happy: Scrap Quilt Block

I’m Sew Happy by Diane Harris for Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Volume 9

I’m sew happy! It’s become my mantra, and it seemed a fitting title for my latest block design for Quiltmaker.

Many have designed spools before me, but I haven’t seen thimbles like mine, above. Pieced thimbles are usually just tumbler shapes, like the ones below. They’re are great, but I wanted a little more detail for this block.

thimblequilt Im Sew Happy: Scrap Quilt Block

Pieced thimbles are usually tumbler shapes like this one from my UFO pile.

This quilt top is from my UFO pile and it has the usual thimble shapes, also called tumblers. It’s waiting patiently for me to quilt it and add some other finishing touches.

 Im Sew Happy: Scrap Quilt Block

I designed my block in EQ7, which is a great tool. I love it and use it a lot. I still have much to learn because there are loads of features. One way to expand your EQ skills is through Quiltmaker’s Creative Spark column.

CSlogo Im Sew Happy: Scrap Quilt BlockCreative Spark is a portfolio of ideas you can use to take a quilt project in a new, different or alternative direction. Brought to you in each regular issue of Quiltmaker by QM and The Electric Quilt Company, you’ll find Creative Spark in print and online. It’s great whether or not you use EQ.

badbutton1 Im Sew Happy: Scrap Quilt Blockbutton2 Im Sew Happy: Scrap Quilt Block

I designed each image in my block separately. At first I was just going to do buttons and I came up with this button quilt.

button quilt Im Sew Happy: Scrap Quilt Block

But then I decided to add the thimble and spools. At first the thimble was a little too large:

mixedblock Im Sew Happy: Scrap Quilt Block

I thought the thimble was too large in this version.

So I tweaked and played around and ended up with a better version.

notions quilt1 Im Sew Happy: Scrap Quilt Block

Okay but not very interesting

If you change the colors and repeat the block, you can have a quilt like this one. It’s okay but it’s not very interesting to me.

scrappynotionsquilt Im Sew Happy: Scrap Quilt Block

Considerably better by using a wider variety of the same colors

You can see that it improves a lot just by making the fabrics more scrappy, even though I’ve maintained the same colors.

I did a lot more tweaking and playing around, and I’m pleased that I’m Sew Happy will become a quilt in the next Quilts from Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks. That issue comes out this fall. I’ll be making the quilt in the next few weeks. The colors and the arrangement are very different from the one above. I hope you’ll like it.

 

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