Quilting: Pass It On

I had a speaking engagement at a small quilt guild in Central City, Nebraska recently. I had the pleasure of meeting three little girls that evening, and I got their parents’ permission to tell you about it.

map of central city ne Quilting: Pass It On
I arrived ahead of the meeting time in order to set up and gather my thoughts. People were trickling in, and I noticed a woman with three girls. I had time to spare so I went over and introduced myself. I was delighted to learn that the girls were with their grandma, who is teaching them to sew. They have already made several quilts and are excited about making more.

In a followup email, Jeanice Steinke shared more about her granddaughters:

pass1 Quilting: Pass It On

Ava

“Ava is a fifth grader. She has made…a small baseball quilt of Four Patches…The next venture was place mats…she has made doll quilts for her little sister also.

“When Ava heard about the guild making quilts for kids in foster homes she wanted to make one. I helped with the instructions and cutting. She did all the sewing, even the straight seam quilting. She made a pillow case to match. Ava loves helping others and she enjoys what she is doing. I hope to teach her the love of quilting.

 

 

pass2 Quilting: Pass It On

Emma

“Emma is a third grader. She has made a small quilt for herself and…doll quilts with…straight seams. Her favorite thing to do is to go through my stash and create fashion. She uses Ava as a model and makes clothes by pinning them together—I don’t let her cut or sew the fabric since I might want it for quilts.

 

 

 

 

pass3 Quilting: Pass It On

Brooklynn

“Brooklynn is so much fun. She thinks grandma can make anything. I have pictures of her using her pretend sewing machine beside mine. She even has a cutter without the blade and a mat. I have set her on my lap and let her sew along with me to make doll quilts.”

 

 

 

 

Show and tell featured a bonanza of charity quilts made by Jeanice. The girls had helped with some of them, which will go to the local hospital, Royal Kids Camp and the Christmas of Sharing program, among others.

CC2 Quilting: Pass It On

Ava Steinke and her grandma Jeanice proudly display a charity quilt during Show & Tell.

It was such a joy to visit with the girls and to help encourage their interest. I believe their grandma is helping them build skills for a lifetime. Think about it:

  • They’re spending time with creative adults
  • They’re learning to meet people
  • They’re thinking and conversing about abstract concepts
  • They’re developing fine motor skills
  • They’re learning to be comfortable with an audience
  • They’re experiencing the joy of giving
  • Their grandma’s love is being poured into them
  • They’re gaining self confidence
  • They’re having fun!
CC3 Quilting: Pass It On

QM Associate Editor Diane Harris with the girls: Emma, Brooklynn and Ava. Future quilters all!

I could go on and on, but if you’ve ever sewn with a child, you know what I mean. It is so much fun! Even when it’s hard work (and it usually is), it’s energizing. It’s a really wonderful thing to pass what you know on to the next generation. Jeanice and her granddaughters are to be congratulated.

If you have never sewn with a child, maybe you could start. If there’s a grandchild, or a neighbor, or someone at your church or a local school who might need an adult to show an interest in them, quilting is the perfect vehicle for that. Here’s a free easy pattern for a star pillow you might want to use.

If you’ve made even a few quilts, then you know enough to help someone else. If you have passed quilting on to someone, I’d love to hear about it in the comments!

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Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window

By Tricia Patterson, Quiltmaker Associate Editor

TravelTools Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window

Summer brings picnics and barbecues, outdoor games, travel to new and familiar places, and lounging on the front porch or backyard patio. I think it’s the perfect time for hand-quilted projects. They travel well. Hand-pieced quilts are portable and lightweight. You can spend some time with them or you can sew a few stitches to make a quilt block as a small bit of time will allow – like when you are waiting for your kids’ teams to start their games. The best thing is … you can quilt while you enjoy being outside, visiting with friends and family or on the go. I’m going to revisit some time-traveled quilt block designs for a few of my blog posts; designs that you can very easily take along with you almost anywhere you go this summer.

QuiltingTools Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window

A few words about portable quilting tools… These pictures are of my traveling quilt studio. It’s always ready to go. I found this great box at a quilt show a long time ago. It’s only about 9″ x 12″. As you can see, it’s been well used. The sand paper allows me to mark small bits of fabric without slipping. It’s great for marking 1/4″ seams as needed. Inside, I carry about everything I might need for grab-and-go hand-quilted projects.

CathedralWindow IntroCWImage Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window

The Cathedral Window is a perfect example of a portable quilt design because with each block you finish the top, middle and backing for the quilt. To make the block requires only two square patches and very few tools. You can make the block any size merely by enlarging the size of the patches. And, it’s a stash-buster, perfect for using up fabrics or scraps from your collection.

From a small amount of research, I discovered that the Cathedral Window, inspired by historic church and cathedral stain glass windows, became popular in North America in the 1930s. Each quilt block is made using a folded patchwork technique. I think it’s similar to origami whereby a fabric square (instead of paper) is folded and stitched to form a unique shape. In this case parts of the fabric are folded back to make a window revealing a contrasting colored square of fabric inside.

There are as many variations for making a Cathedral Window block, as there are methods. Here are steps for making a simple Cathedral Window that’s fast and easy. I learned this method many, many years ago from one of the first quilt books I purchased, Erica Wilson’s Quilts of America, written by Erica Wilson, released in 1979. (Please note, I may have modified Erica’s version over time. I believe I’ve covered the basics in the directions below.)

Materials

  • 1 large 9″ square of fabric and 1 smaller 5″ contrasting square of fabric (These squares make one 4″ finished block.)
  • Thread to match the color of the large square
  • Tools: Scissors, straight pins (no more than 10), seam gauge and 6″ ruler with a 1/4″ mark, needle, and thimble (optional)

CathedralWindow PrepareSquares Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window

Prepare the Squares Before You Go (however not necessary)

On the large fabric square, fold over the front of the fabric 1/2″ to the wrong side, on two opposite sides of the square, as shown in the photo. Press the fold down with an iron, pin or finger press to hold the fold in place. On the small square, repeat to fold the fabric 1/2″ on all sides of the square.

Making the Cathedral Window

CathedralWindowStep1 Use Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window

Step 1. Fold the large square in half, wrong side of fabric out, to make a rectangle. With a pencil or other marker, measure and mark a seam allowance of 1/2″ for each side of the rectangle. Next, measure and mark 2″ from the top folded edge on each side of the rectangle, with a straight pin or marking pencil. Using a short running stitch, sew from the folded edge to the 2″ mark on the 1/2″ line.

CathedralWindow Step2 CWPocket Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window

Step 2. Turn the rectangle inside out. Finger-press the sides with seams open as you tuck in the lower edges to make smooth straight sides. When you are finished you should have a rectangular pocket.

 

Step 3. Bring the two stitched sides of the pocket together toward the middle as shown in the photo. Flatten to create a square as shown in the photo. Measure 2″ from each side of the square’s center opening; mark each side with a straight pin. You should have a total length of 4″ between the pins. Using an overcast stitch, sew the 4″ opening close. Be careful to avoid catching the fabric from the back of the folded square.

CathedralWindow Step3a Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window    CathedralWindow Step3b Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window    CathedralWindow Step3c Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window

Step 4. Place the large folded square on a flat surface, stitched side down. Place the 5″ contrasting color square on top of the folded square, as shown in the photo, folded edges facing the large folded square. Bring together all the outer corners of the large folded square toward the center. Secure the corner edges together in the center with a tack stitch.

CathedralWindow Step4a Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window     CathedralWindowStep4b Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window

CathedralWindow Step5 Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window

Step 5. You are almost finished! Now, it’s time to make the windows. Refer to the photo. From one corner of the large folded square, fold back the edges slightly to see the contrasting color fabric. Bring back a lot of the large folded square or a small amount depending on how much of the contrasting fabric you want to see. Pin the edges in place. Using a blind stitch, secure the edges of the folded over fabric. Repeat for the remaining three sides. As you stitch each, close off the corner edge with a few tack stitches. Again, it’s your decision about how much of the corner edge you close. Stitch multiple blocks together from the back of the blocks using a blind stitch or overcast stitch.

CathedralWindow FinishedCW Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window

Cathedral Window blocks are beautiful as pillow tops and wall hangings, hot pads and bed quilts. Individual blocks make great coffee coasters. Be sure to search the Internet for other variations of the Cathedral Window block and wonderful ideas for using them.

Have a happy quilt’n summer!

CathedralWindow PurpleTealBatikCW Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window   CathedralWindow MultipleCWs Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window   CathedralWindow YellowOrangeBatikCW Quilting That Travels Part 1: Cathedral Window

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P.S. Want to learn more about making a quilt by hand? Download this new free ebook from our sister magazine Quilters Newsletter. It includes tips on selecting the right thread as well as some pretty hand quilting designs.

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Won’t You Please Read the TOC?

The TOC—pronounced tee-oh-see—is what people in the magazine business call the Table of Contents. It’s one of those before-you-get-down-to-business pages at the front of an issue. Please don’t tell me you’ve never noticed the TOC, because right now it’s a big big part of my work life.

toc5 Wont You Please Read the TOC?

Quiltmaker July/August ’16 TOC

I have to admit that I never thought much about the TOC until I was assigned to write it. You probably haven’t either, because it’s not where the meat of a magazine lives. It’s more like the pre-appetizer appetizer, where you wet your whistle for the good stuff, which of course consists of the patterns and the articles.

But the TOC doesn’t just magically happen. Somebody has to think up all the pretty words and enticing descriptions for everything in every issue, and that somebody is me.

toc2 Wont You Please Read the TOC?

McCall’s Quilting Jan/Feb 2016 TOC

It’s funny because for as long as I’ve been here, which is 13 years, everyone who has written the TOC has strongly disliked doing it. I’m not sure why, because I love doing it!

It’s a challenge for me to come up with friendly, engaging ways to invite you to fall in love with one of our designs. I enjoy considering what makes it special, or what would nudge a reader to make it. And I adore playing around with words: alliteration, rhythm, cadence, tempo and all the rest. This stuff makes my heart beat like a drum!

toc3 Wont You Please Read the TOC?

Quick Quilts June/July ’16 TOC

Now I will also admit that occasionally, I am tempted to write something snarky. If a pattern has given me fits, I would sometimes like to say, “Make this fetching throw if you fancy a trip to the funny farm.”

Or if I think a quilt is hideous (because of course we can’t all love every single quilt and you know, different strokes…), and also difficult to construct, I might consider writing, “Purple, orange and green have never looked worse than in this back-breaking king-size nightmare.” 

toc1 Wont You Please Read the TOC?

Quiltmaker May/June ’16 TOC

In these cases I quickly subdue my impulses and write something polite and appropriate, because of course there will be many people who will adore these designs. I’d hate to rain on anybody’s parade.

MQ10716 Wont You Please Read the TOC?
Yesterday I got my advance copies of McCall’s Quilting July/August ’16. I turned straight to the TOC. Here are some of the blurbs I wrote for this issue:

DPMQP160806 2 Wont You Please Read the TOC?

3 Musketeers

3 Musketeers
Is it a medallion or isn’t it? Only the famous trio knows for sure!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DPMQP160812 2 Wont You Please Read the TOC?

Confused Geese

Confused Geese
The honkers are flying every which way, but rest assured: this design has a plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DPMQP160802 2 Wont You Please Read the TOC?

Rocket’s Red Glare

Rocket’s Red Glare
The Road to Oklahoma never looked so good—take it straight to a Quilt of Valor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The trick is to have some snappy words, to make the words fit in the allotted space, and to get the page numbers and technical details correct. I would estimate that between the photographer, the artists and the editors, it takes about eight man-hours to create a TOC.

So the next time you pick up a copy of Quiltmaker,

QM1608 COVER 500 Wont You Please Read the TOC?

…or Quick Quilts,

QQ10616 Wont You Please Read the TOC?

…or McCall’s Quilting,

MQ10716 Wont You Please Read the TOC?

…please please PLEASE read the TOC. You will make my day!

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100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along – Block 12

Hi! Welcome back!  Thanks for joining us in the 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along. How are your blocks coming along?

All of the blocks in this design have come from the different issues of Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks and all have been reduced to 6″. There are kits available in different colorways, as well as a digital pattern. You can catch up on the previous sew along posts here.

100BLKS SAMP ALL 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 12

three versions of the 100 Blocks Sampler

This week’s block is Sew-Easy Butterflies, block #200 from Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks, vol. 3. It was designed by Darlene Zimmerman. This is a great block to show off four different fabrics in these simple-to-piece butterflies.

200 1 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 12

Sew-Easy Butterflies, block #200 by Darlene Zimmerman

This block is simple to sew with rectangles and squares.

200 2 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 12

Stitch-and-flip units

Here is the block assembly.

200 3 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 12

Sew-Easy block assembly.

Here are the three different colorways.

200 4 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 12

Sew-Easy Butterflies, three different colorways.

It’s fun to see how different they all look.

Are you visiting the other designers who are sewing along with us?

Follow the links below to visit their blogs:

Lynn Roddy Brown

Jessie Kurtz

Toby Lischko

We’re taking a little break next week, giving you more time to get your blocks caught up. Our next sew along post will be on 6/8. And, just to make sure you come back and visit us, I’ll have another giveaway for you. Tune in on 6/8 to see what it is!

See you next time. And don’t forget to send pictures of your blocks to editor@quiltmaker.com!

 

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New Issue: Quiltmaker July/August ’16

QM1608 COVER 500 New Issue: Quiltmaker July/August ’16

Our July/August ’16 issue hits newsstands June 2, and if you’re a subscriber you’ve either received your copy or will very soon! This brand new edition includes 13 new quilt patterns that are perfect for summertime. The cover quilt, Let Freedom Ring, was designed by our content director Carolyn Beam and will be the focus quilt for our upcoming season 3 of Lessons in Creativity on QNNtv. A patriotic star appears in the design when the red and blue Log Cabin blocks are arranged! There’s also two more patriotic designs, a trio of triangle quilt projects, a fabulous scrap quilt designed by Kathryn Wagar Wright, a new Bonnie Hunter block and more. Take a peek of some of the designs in this newest issue:

QM1608 DAWNSTAR 01 New Issue: Quiltmaker July/August ’16

Dawnstar

Dawnstar: Pretty floral prints, unique blocks and a sopisticated color palette make up this lovely throw quilt designed by Wendy Sheppard. Kits are available for a limited time.

QM1608 BUBBLEGUM 02 New Issue: Quiltmaker July/August ’16

Bubble Gum Baby

Bubble Gum Baby: Make a quick baby quilt with this sweet and colorful design.

QM1608 BLUE 01 New Issue: Quiltmaker July/August ’16

Blue Cheese Night

Blue Cheese Night: Traditional stars collide in this queen-sized quilt designed by our associate editor Diane Harris. Flying Geese form the star points and Baptist Fan quilting finishes it off in style.

QM1608 SUMMER 02 New Issue: Quiltmaker July/August ’16

Summer Sizzler

Summer Sizzler: This table runner designed by Barbara Cline is perfectly patriotic. The stars and stripes emerge as rows of foundation piecing and triangles are joined.

QM1608 WEDDING 02 New Issue: Quiltmaker July/August ’16

Wedding Diamonds

Wedding Diamonds: Designed by Scott Flanagan, this throw quilt is made using the same triangle templates for both the diamond and star blocks. Kits are available for a limited time.

Browse our online gallery to preview all 13 quilt patterns included in this issue. Keep an eye out for the issue at newsstands, or grab a print or digital edition in our online store.

Happy Quilting,
Natalie

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It’s a Wrap: QM Scrap Squad Part 1

It’s been my pleasure to manage the QM Scrap Squad since its inception five and a half years ago. I have enjoyed the teams of reader-sewers so very much. Each person was unique in what she brought to the table, and these makers faithfully reproduced QM patterns month after month. It’s been delightful for me, and I hope for readers of Quilty Pleasures, too.

QM scrap squadB Its a Wrap: QM Scrap Squad Part 1As a bonus, I feel like I have made new quilting friends all over the country. And some of the Scrap Squad members have become friends with each other, too. I love it when I see them interacting on Facebook or commenting on each other’s blog posts.

Scrap Squad 2011 and 2012

Our announcement that applications for Scrap Squad were open generated several hundred inquiries in late 2010. Reading through them and narrowing it down was a tall order. I could have put together at least a dozen amazing teams from this pool of people! The talent was incredible and the enthusiasm was overwhelming.

I agonized over telling so many people that they were not on the first Scrap Squad. It was harder than I thought it would be. I wrote and rewrote that email. It was a crummy day.

Then these women formed the very first QM Scrap Squad.

2011 Scrap Squad collage Its a Wrap: QM Scrap Squad Part 1

2011 Scrap Squad, counter-clockwise from top left, Donna Amos, Kim Brandt, Linda Ferguson, Dionne Gordon, Forest Jane, Pat St-Onge, Carol Vickers, Ruth Wasmuth

  • Donna Amos from Decatur, Arkansas
  • Kim Brandt from Poughkeepsie, New York
  • Linda Ferguson from San Jose, California
  • Dionne Gordon from Bellevue, Washington
  • Forest Jane from Memphis, Tennessee
  • Pat St-Onge from St-Jacques, New Brunswick, Canada
  • Carol Vickers from New Philadelphia, Ohio
  • Ruth Wasmuth from Lafayette, Indiana

It was a learning experience for all of us, and they were terrific sports as we forged ahead together. I felt guilty about what we were asking them to do, so I offered them “stash enhancement” from my own fabric collection. I could do this because an editor ends up with a lot of extra fabric that she comes by free of charge. I was happy to be able to share, and it made them happy too! Here are some of my favorite scrap quilts and blog posts from this group of ladies. Be sure to read the posts that are linked because there is so much to learn from these quilts and their makers.

donna2 Its a Wrap: QM Scrap Squad Part 1

Linkin’ Logs made by Donna Amos for Quiltmaker’s Scrap Squad

Donna Amos’s Linkin’ Logs quilt used four matching vintage feedsacks for the background. Such vibrance from a humble pink print!

kimdc8 Its a Wrap: QM Scrap Squad Part 1

Dream Catcher by Kim Brandt for Quiltmaker’s Scrap Squad

Kim Brandt gave us a dose of Christmas cheer with her version of Dream Catcher. Isn’t that border to die for?

Pat St Onge 1 Its a Wrap: QM Scrap Squad Part 1

Hip to be Square by Pat St-Onge for Quiltmaker’s Scrap Squad

And what’s not to love about an easy quilt that takes a huge bite out of your scrap stash? Pat St-Onge’s Hip to be Square was a winner all around.

P1110660 Its a Wrap: QM Scrap Squad Part 1

Linkin’ Logs by Ruth Wasmuth for Quiltmaker’s Scrap Squad

We used Ruth Wasmuth’s Linkin’ Logs quilt to talk about lessons in value and contrast. I think this quilt is dynamite!

jane11 Its a Wrap: QM Scrap Squad Part 1

Spinout by Forest Jane for Quiltmaker’s Scrap Squad

Forest Jane wowed everyone with her Spinout that included a wonderful pieced border and batiks in a variety of colors.

There’s so much good material here, but that’s enough for one day. We’ll revisit the other 2011 Scrap Squad members in the next post. Thanks for walking with me down memory lane!

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Quilters! Engage Your Significant Someone

By Tricia Patterson, Quiltmaker Associate Editor

While waiting for my lunch to warm up one day at work I found a book written by John Ryder, A Husband’s Guide to Quilt Appreciation, lying by the microwave. This book propelled my thinking about the role my husband (my significant someone, a.k.a SS) has played in my quilting journey. He married into quilting. He has had to accept quilting as part of who I am, one of my special attributes, and a force to be reckoned with as part of our marriage contract. I’m sure there are many days he has wondered why he was ever attracted to a quilter.

 Quilters! Engage Your Significant Someone

Brian Crane | picklescomic.com

I’ve decided quilters really are unique to our species. Many of us work outside the home, are raising families, manage the household, run errands, and have only a few minutes we can actually call our own every day. We do all the things others do except we choose to quilt to relax, to have an activity we can call our own, for a social outlet, to belong to a community of like-minded people, or to give us a creative outlet. We have passion for fabric and fabric shops; we build a stash, keep up with the latest designers and patterns, and have on-going projects – many of them – in various stages of completion. It’s another job to be a quilter. And, for lots of us, to be dedicated to quilting and get our precious quilt time, we often rely on a helper – that significant someone we share life with.

 Quilters! Engage Your Significant Someone

with-heart-and-hands.com

I like to think quilting has added another dimension to my husband’s life, definitely one that he never dreamed of, or knew about before he married me. I’ve brought my SS along with me on my quilting journey. He can recognize and name several quilt patterns, like cathedral window, yo-yo, and log cabin. He doesn’t roll his eyes quite as much as he did when we were first married when I say, “I have to stop at the quilt shop to pick up a few things.” (Although, he does still utter something unintelligible under his breath when he balances the checkbook.)

 

 Quilters! Engage Your Significant Someone

facebook.com/QuiltingSewingCreating/

He’s helped me layout designs on the floor and the bed to get the perfect placement. My SS has even helped me pick out fabric and colors, and given my quilts names. He helped me set up my quilting studio ­– in many locations. He’s put up bookshelves and storage units for me to stash my stuff. He’s moved boxes and boxes of quilting supplies from place-to-place (only once internationally). He puts up with all my stuff on the dining room table, and the floor around it, for weeks at a time. He’s become very tolerant when I ask if he will start, or even make, dinner, when I say, “I just need to stitch this last piece together.” My SS has learned to control the pain when he steps on a pin or needle. He doesn’t try to use any of my quilting equipment (except a needle to take out splinters). And, all those threads; they are everywhere. I guess he accepts that like our dog sheds hair, his wife sheds threads all over the house.

And what’s best … my SS admires my quilts, the work that goes into making a special gift, a memory for our kids, or something for our home. He’s proud that I am a quilter.

 Quilters! Engage Your Significant Someone

nationalquilterscircle.com

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For more quilting humor, check out our Quilty Quotes page!

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It’s A Wrap: The Final QM Scrap Squad Quilt

Believe it or not, we have come to the end of the Scrap Squad quilts. It’s been a real pleasure for the past five years. I’ll write a separate post to wrap things up, but today we have a beautiful quilt from Kathy Wagner for you.

QM scrap squadB Its A Wrap: The Final QM Scrap Squad QuiltKathy hails from Cambridge, Ontario. She’s done a great job of making scrappy quilts from Quiltmaker patterns all year. We really appreciate her efforts on our behalf!

kathycropped1 Its A Wrap: The Final QM Scrap Squad Quilt

Kathy Wagner from Cambridge, Ontario

You’ll hear from Kathy in her own words below.

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Our final Scrap Squad assignment was to make anything from Quiltmaker that caught our fancy. That’s a lot of leeway! Finally I decided on a quilt called Which Way to Go? by Nancy Allen from the Sept/Oct 2015 issue.

25897 pattern img Its A Wrap: The Final QM Scrap Squad Quilt

Which Way to Go? by Nancy Allen for Quiltmaker’s Sept/Oct ’15 issue

My first challenge was to pick some fabrics. I knew I was going to use up grey scraps, but could not settle on a background fabric. All the neutral choices were too light, so I had decided to use teal like the quilt in the magazine.

IMG 4251 300x197 Its A Wrap: The Final QM Scrap Squad Quilt

But it just didn’t make my grey fabrics happy. The fabrics sat for a long time until some quilting friends were over and convinced me to go with the unusual choice of red for the background. It was a total departure for me, but I was very happy with the contrast the red provided with the greys.

 

My second challenge was to cut the fabric using the proper instructions. At first I started cutting using the die cutting instructions, but as soon as I began I knew those measurements wouldn’t work. Duh! I was reading the wrong part!

Editor’s Note: If you’re an AccuQuilt user, we’ve written instructions especially for that! If you are not, there are instructions in our ordinary style as well.

 

IMG 4270 173x300 Its A Wrap: The Final QM Scrap Squad Quilt

The third challenge was to make an interesting backing. Since the theme of the quilt was making choices among all the shades of grey, I made one big arrow block for the backing.

The arrow is pointing UP of course, because we hope that people will make choices to UPlift us all!

 

It’s fun to make something a little different for the back of the quilt. It’s like an extra surprise when you turn the quilt over.

 

IMG 4381 600 Its A Wrap: The Final QM Scrap Squad QuiltAnd here is my version of Which Way to Go?, using the red background fabric. I didn’t add the border from the pattern and just finished it with a red binding.

I quilted it on my regular sewing machine in horizontal lines, some with the walking foot and some with the free motion foot.

I am so sad that my year of participating on the Quiltmaker Scrap Squad is over. It has been a fantastic experience, and I cannot say enough wonderful things about our editor Diane Harris.

See you all on the Quilty Pleasures blog!

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A digital pattern for this quilt, Which Way to Go?, is available at QuiltandSewShop.com for $7.99.

Please watch Quilty Pleasures for posts to wrap up the QM Scrap Squad in the days to come.

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100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along – Block 11

Hi ! Welcome to the 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along. If you’re new, thanks for joining us as we work our way through the 100 Blocks Sampler. All of the blocks in this design have come from the different issues of Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks and all have been reduced to 6″.

100BLKS SAMP ALL 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 11

three versions of the 100 Blocks Sampler

There are still kits available for the different colorways, as well as a digital pattern.

You can catch up on the previous sew along posts here.

Today we’re featuring In and Out, block #293 from Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks, volume 3. This block was designed by Celine Perkins. Celine is also sewing along with us, so be sure to check out her blog as well.

293 1 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 11

In and Out, block #293 from Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks, vol. 3, designed by Celine Perkins.

293 2 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 11

In and Out assembly

293 3 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 11

In and Out in three different colorways

Be sure to visit the other designers who are sewing along with us as well.

Follow the links below to visit their blogs:

Lynn Roddy Brown

Jessie Kurtz

Toby Lischko

See you next time. And don’t forget to send pictures of your blocks to editor@quiltmaker.com!

 

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Win a Set of Designer Blocks from 100 Blocks Vol. 13!


100 Blocks Vol. 13 Win a Set of Designer Blocks from 100 Blocks Vol. 13!
How would you like to own some of the designer-made blocks featured in our new 100 Blocks Vol. 13 issue? You can – we’re giving them all away to lucky quilters like you!

That’s right – you could win some of the original quilt blocks designed by Bonnie Hunter, Kate Colleran, Amanda Murphy, Margie Ullery, Corey Yoder and more of today’s top designers. Just think what fun additions these blocks would make to your sewing space.

Twenty winners will win five blocks each. Don’t delay – winners will be chosen 6/27/16.

Click here to visit the contest page and enter. Good luck!

Happy Quilting,
Natalie

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