Coming Next Week: 100 Blocks Vol. 15 Blog Tour

Join us here on Quilty Pleasures May 1-5 for all the fun

170425 header Coming Next Week: 100 Blocks Vol. 15 Blog Tour

The newest volume of Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks hits newsstands next week, and print and digital copies are available to purchase early in our online shop!

Vol15 COVER Coming Next Week: 100 Blocks Vol. 15 Blog Tour

This edition includes 100 brand new quilt blocks from your favorite designers. We’ll be celebrating the issue’s release all week long on Quilty Pleasures, and we’re totally revamping the blog tour this time around to bring you even more fun and excitement.

As always, there will be lots of designer inspiration and fun giveaways. We’ll also have a grand prize souvenir hunt, color option ideas, an inside look at how our team put the issue together and much more.

See you there!

~ The Quiltmaker team

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Monday’s Washday: A Visit with Heidi Pridemore

Today we’re excited to welcome designer Heidi Pridemore as a guest blogger on Quilty Pleasures! Heidi is going to tell us about her whimsical new quilt, Monday’s Washday:

QM1706 WASHDAY 450style Mondays Washday: A Visit with Heidi Pridemore

Monday’s Washday

43″ x 52″

Designed by Heidi Pridemore

Heidi Pridemore Mondays Washday: A Visit with Heidi PridemoreHello fellow quilters, I am so happy to be a guest blogger for Quiltmaker. I am also excited to share my Monday’s Washday quilt that is featured in the May/June ’17 issue #175.

I used the beautiful line of fabric called Frou Frou, distributed by Clothworks. The fabrics are from France and have a lovely lightweight silky feel to them. The Frou Frou collection is so cool because the line is never discontinued and they also offer a full line of matching spaghetti straps, bias tapes and buttons to go with the different prints mostly for garment construction.

When I was approached to design a quilt for this group. I thought, why not create a quilt that represents what the collection was designed for by creating little dresses? I thought of paper doll dresses from my youth and used this as additional inspiration for the design. I also knew I wanted to incorporate the trims and buttons from the collection into the design. So I decided to use the spaghetti straps for the straps and belts for the appliqued dresses. I used the matching buttons for the flowers on the quilt. Here are some photos of how I assembled the quilt top.

heidi pridemore 1 Mondays Washday: A Visit with Heidi Pridemore

First I assembled all the tools I would need. I had the dresses, cut and ready to go. I also used a piece of wax paper and glue stick, along with sharp scissors for this part.

heidi pridemore 2 Mondays Washday: A Visit with Heidi Pridemore

First I cut the belts from the spaghetti strap for the dresses about 1/4″ longer on each side of the dress. Then I used the glue stick to attach the spaghetti strap strips to the dresses. I centered the belt onto the dress and then folded the excess to the back of the dress and glued them in place. This created a finished edge on each side of the belt.

heidi pridemore 3 Mondays Washday: A Visit with Heidi Pridemore

Then I started an assembly line to finish all the dresses.

heidi pridemore 5 Mondays Washday: A Visit with Heidi Pridemore

Next I added the straps to each dress, again using the glue stick to attach them to the wrong side of the dresses.

heidi pridemore 6 Mondays Washday: A Visit with Heidi Pridemore

Now it was time to hang the dresses on the clothesline. First I positioned the clothesline onto the background and used the glue stick to hold it in place.

heidi pridemore 7 Mondays Washday: A Visit with Heidi Pridemore

I started with the dress in the middle of each curve and positioned the rest of the dresses in place. I tucked the dress straps under the clothesline by carefully peeling up the clothesline and then pressed the dresses in place.

Once all the dresses were in place I used a blanket stitch to stitch the dresses, clothesline, belts and straps in place. I used a lime green thread from Aurifil to finish all the edges.

Next I used the glue stitch method to position and place each stem in between the dresses. I finished the edges of each with a blanket stitch.

For the buttons, I use the Button Foot for my BERNINA to machine stitch each button in place. To keep them from sliding around as I stitched, I used my old standby, the glue stick to hold them in place. This made quick work of attaching the buttons.

I hope you have enjoyed the behind the scenes look at how this sweet quilt was made.

Please visit my blog http://heidipridemore.blogspot.com each month where I will share with you some tips and tricks on cutting and assembling of the free project of the month along with posting the free pattern on our website The Whimsical Workshop.

Happy Quilting,

Heidi Pridemore

* * *

Thank you for joining us today, Heidi!

If you’d like to make Monday’s Washday and don’t have a copy of our May/June ’17 issue, print and digital copies are available in our online store. 

digital pattern is also available for Monday’s Washday.

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Can You Find It?: A Visit with Diane Harris

diane harris Can You Find It?: A Visit with Diane HarrisPlease join us as we welcome our dear friend Diane Harris of Stash Bandit (stashbandit.net) back to Quilty Pleasures today!

Diane is here to tell us about her fun Can You Find It? quilt — aka the cover star for our current issue of Quiltmaker:

I was pleased to spot my most recent I Spy quilt on the cover of Quiltmaker’s May/June issue.

My idea was a simple one: I wondered if anyone had ever put novelty fabrics in the middle of Churn Dash blocks. I don’t know that I was the first, but I can say that I love how this quilt turned out. I made it completely from my stash.

QM1706 FIND 450flat Can You Find It?: A Visit with Diane Harris

The great thing about Churn Dash is that you can change up the proportions endlessly.

Churn Dash 1 Can You Find It?: A Visit with Diane Harris

I played around with the fabrics I wanted to feature until I was satisfied that the size of the center patch was sufficient.

Churn Dash 2 Can You Find It?: A Visit with Diane Harris

Churn Dash 3 Can You Find It?: A Visit with Diane Harris

Since most of the fabrics were bright, clear colors, I wondered if black and white prints would be good as neutrals. It only took a few blocks to decide I loved it. I balanced out the backgrounds and the Churn Dash patches in diagonal rows, which you only notice if you look closely. If nothing else, it made me feel like there was some order in the chaos.

findit hq Can You Find It?: A Visit with Diane Harris

The biggest surprise of all was when I went to audition fabrics for borders. I always feel like blue is the universal neutral that ties everything together, but it didn’t seem to do much for this quilt. Neither did red, green or orange. In frustration I threw up the wild idea of a black and white chevron, and voila, it was like an exclamation point!

QM100517 Can You Find It?: A Visit with Diane Harris

It takes a perfect storm for a quilt to land on the cover of a magazine. It’s only happened to me a few times, and it’s always exciting. When you see it in the grocery store, you want to grab the nearest shopper and babble away in excitement.

I hope you’ll corral some novelty prints and give this quilt a go. It’s easy and it’s really fun!

Come visit my new website at StashBandit.net. You might enjoy Become a Color-Savvy Quilter or Five Easy Ways to Improve Your Patchwork. Quilt on!

* * *

Thank you for joining us today, Diane!

If you’d like to make Can You Find It? and don’t have a copy of our May/June ’17 issue, print and digital copies are available in our online store. 

digital pattern is also available for Can You Find It?

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Design Inspiration: Mountain Lil’s and Lily’s Dreams

mountain lils quilt hq Design Inspiration: Mountain Lil’s and Lilys Dreams

By Tricia Patterson
Designer and Associate Editor, Quiltmaker

As a quilter I have so many things in my life that inspire my quilt designs. I’m inspired by the world around me, such as drawing from the elements of nature or the aesthetic I want to create in my home. I’m also greatly influenced by the people I make quilts for, the things my family and friends enjoy or favor, like their extracurricular activities, their work or favorite colors, and their personality. When I decide to make a quilt for someone, I generally consider these things and incorporate them in the design. The Mountain Lil’s quilt design in the May/June issue of Quiltmaker is a perfect example of my approach to the creative journey I take with each of my quilts.

Mountain Lils Block Alternate Design Inspiration: Mountain Lil’s and Lilys Dreams

As I mention in the sidebar of the pattern in the magazine, the Mountain Lil’s quilt design was inspired by my granddaughter Lily, (who has always been attracted to the variety of color), colorful Colorado where I live and the visual memories I have from hiking the high country of the Rocky Mountain range. All of these things came together in my mind as I created the design for fabrics Lily chose for a quilt on a fabric expedition during one of her visits to Colorado.

The quilt using Lily’s design that I submitted to consider for a Quiltmaker issue was made with a floral fabric from Moda Fabrics that I’ve had in my stash for a while. I purchased yardage on a whim, nothing planned for it other that I just fell in love with it (Oh my, what a surprise a quilter would ever do that!). I was attracted to the colors and the vivid flowers; I thought it would be perfect for the focus fabric in Lily’s pattern. The fabric was just waiting for this quilt and I continued the vibrancy of the color by pairing it with tone-on-tone fabrics from Northcott’s Toscana line.

I know so many quilters that don’t feel they have the inner creativity to design a quilt. I had the same mindset for so long; it kept me from exploring new ideas. My breakthrough moments came when I wanted to make graduation quilts for my sons. I stretched my quilting imagination because I wanted to include elements of their past lives and future aspirations in their quilts. I searched for specific block patterns and fabrics to represent my theme and quilted shapes of significant objects into the finished quilt top to hold the layers together. It was a simple first start to exploring my own creativity. Since then the ideas and creations have become endless.

To show you an alternate version of the pattern in Quiltmaker, here are a few photos of Lily’s finished quilt. I created the lettering for the quilt backing during a staff challenge, leveraging the Best Day Ever pattern in December/January 2017 issue of McCall’s Quick Quilts. (If you are so inclined, patterns for letters can be found at Best Day Ever Free Alphabet Characters Block Patterns.)

Mountain Lilys quilt 1 Design Inspiration: Mountain Lil’s and Lilys Dreams

Mountain Lilys quilt 2 Design Inspiration: Mountain Lil’s and Lilys Dreams

* * *

If you’d like to make Mountain Lil’s and don’t have a copy of our May/June ’17 issue, print and digital copies are available in our online store. 

digital pattern is also available for Mountain Lil’s.

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Pixie Pathways: A Visit with Kate Colleran

CroppedWEBSZBonnieMcCafferyPhoto850 3081KateColleran Pixie Pathways: A Visit with Kate Colleran

Please join us in welcoming designer Kate Colleran from Seams Like a Dream as a guest blogger on Quilty Pleasures today! Kate is going to tell us all about the design process for her beautiful Pixie Pathways quilt from our spring ’17 issue of Quilts From Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks.

 

When I was thinking about created my original block that was in the Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks magazine, vol 14, Pixie Hearts, I wanted to create a heart that was made from squares. I also knew I wanted a chain element. I love blocks with chains in them. They draw the eye and help it move around the quilt. I designed my block with those two ideas in mind.

QM100 COLL Pixie Pathways: A Visit with Kate Colleran

Pixie Hearts block

When I decided to make the block into a quilt, I chose to make the block a little smaller and move some elements around. The basics of the block are still there; the red heart shape formed with a square and a rectangle. But I moved the secondary hearts around. And, instead of one of them being pink, another a traditional heart color, I made the two secondary hearts blue and green. Those little changes, along with the stronger navy color in the chain section, really made the red hearts stand out.

Pixie Pathways block Pixie Pathways: A Visit with Kate Colleran

EQ image of the new block

The stronger chain color also helps the chain become a more visible secondary element. And using white sashing with small sashing squares in red, well, now there is a third element to see! I really love how this quilt came out!

QF16 PIXIE 450flat Pixie Pathways: A Visit with Kate Colleran

Pixie Pathways quilt

The fabrics are from Bonnie and Camille’s Basic line for Moda and they compliment the pattern beautifully. My original block also used their fabrics from a line called Ruby. I guess I like their style!

Of course, you don’t have to copy my style with the fabrics. You could go more sophisticated with the a black, grey and white version with just a pop of red.

Black and red quilt 2 Pixie Pathways: A Visit with Kate Colleran

Or, if you like the fall colors, how about greens and browns with a pop of orange?

Fall quilt Pixie Pathways: A Visit with Kate Colleran

Or you could pick from the colors of summer, yellow, blues, greens and maybe a pop of hot pink.

Summer quilt Pixie Pathways: A Visit with Kate Colleran

Another favorite design element are blocks that can make the quilt look different just by turing them different ways.

You could make the chain squares form a horizontal zig zag.

zig zag horizontal Pixie Pathways: A Visit with Kate Colleran

Or a vertical zigzag.

zig zag vertical Pixie Pathways: A Visit with Kate Colleran

Or make them into straight lines on the diagonal.

lines on diagonal Pixie Pathways: A Visit with Kate Colleran

There are lots of possibilities.

I would love to hear what colors and what setting you will choose for your Pixie Pathways quilt!

happy quilting,

Kate

* * *

Thank you for joining us today, Kate!

If you’d like to make Pixie Pathways and don’t have a copy of our Quilts From Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks spring ’17 issue, print and digital copies are available in our online store. 

digital pattern is also available for Pixie Pathways.

For more quilting fun with Kate, check out her online course: Creative Quilting for Home Decor. Kate will show you how to make quilted pillows, table runners, table toppers and placemats during this fun online learning experience!

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Follow Your Arrow: A Visit with Rachel M. Hayes

rachel hayes Follow Your Arrow: A Visit with Rachel M. Hayes

We’re so happy to welcome designer Rachel M. Hayes today as a guest blogger on Quilty Pleasures! Rachel is going to tell us all about the design process for her bright and fun Follow Your Arrow quilt.

Hello!  Rachel M. Hayes here to talk a bit about my quilt, Follow Your Arrow, published in Quiltmaker’s Quilts from 100 Blocks magazine, Spring ’17. First a little about myself.

I am basically a self-taught quilter, and because I’m self-taught, I’ve made every mistake imaginable! So, mistakes don’t scare me. Read on, and you’ll see an example.  :) I started quilting in 2007 and have made over 170 quilts to date, most as gifts or charity quilts, but I must admit, our home is decorated heavily with my quilts.  I am now semi-retired, working about 25 hours a week, and in addition to quilting, I also run, paddleboad, read (researching is “my thing”), cook, and I get a kick out of learning new things.  I had my first quilt design published in 2015 and have been blessed enough to have nine more published in 2016 and 2017 so far.

A while back I was playing around trying to create an image to be representative of my website called Around the Blocks (found at www.rachelmhayes.com).  I came up with this simple design. I decided to submit a 12” block using this bright design, to Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks magazine.

arrow1 Follow Your Arrow: A Visit with Rachel M. Hayes

Quiltmaker had suggested that we submit a quilt design from the block in addition to the block itself.  I came up with several possibilities using my EQ7 software. Not this one, too busy.

Arrow2 Follow Your Arrow: A Visit with Rachel M. Hayes

Nope, not this one either.  I liked it OK, but wanted something a little simpler.

arrow3 Follow Your Arrow: A Visit with Rachel M. Hayes

I wanted something that would go together really quick, and shout “HAPPY!” This is the design I settled on.

arrow4 Follow Your Arrow: A Visit with Rachel M. Hayes

I like to chain piece and this design allowed for lots and lots of chain piecing.

arrow5 Follow Your Arrow: A Visit with Rachel M. Hayes

arrow6 Follow Your Arrow: A Visit with Rachel M. Hayes

arrow7 Follow Your Arrow: A Visit with Rachel M. Hayes

I think I got my money’s worth from my Gypsy Quilter Cutting Gizmo thread cutter, which by the way, can be found on Amazon.

I made the big center square, then the 12″ squares.  It went together very fast.

arrow8 Follow Your Arrow: A Visit with Rachel M. Hayes

I had a little trouble, as I underestimated my black yardage (umm, one of those mistakes I alluded to).  I ended up piecing lots of tiny sections together to have enough.  Have you done that before?  Surely I am not the only one!

arrow9 Follow Your Arrow: A Visit with Rachel M. Hayes

I am happy to report, with the fabric being a black background, the piecing is practically invisible.

A few more pictures of this vibrant, happy quilt.

arrow10 Follow Your Arrow: A Visit with Rachel M. Hayes

arrow11 Follow Your Arrow: A Visit with Rachel M. Hayes

I am hooked on using a stripe binding, especially for children/baby quilts.  In this one, I used a simple black and white stripe.  It gives the quilt a bit more whimsy.

arrow12 Follow Your Arrow: A Visit with Rachel M. Hayes

I thought this would be a great toddler quilt for a little boy.  Can’t you just see a little one running his toy cars along the arrows?  I actually had my first grandson in mind, when I created this quilt.

Head on over to the website at rachelmhayes.com and see my other projects.  If you make a quilt using this block, I’d love you to send me a picture!

Rachel

* * *

Thank you for joining us today, Rachel!

If you’d like to make Follow Your Arrow and don’t have a copy of our Quilts From Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Spring ’17 issue, print and digital copies are available in our online store. 

digital pattern is also available for Follow Your Arrow.

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Pieces of Flora: A Visit with Kay Mackenzie

kay mackenzie2 Pieces of Flora: A Visit with Kay Mackenzie

Today we’re excited to welcome designer Kay Mackenzie as a guest blogger on Quilty Pleasures! Kay is going to tell us about the inspiration for her Pieces of Flora appliqué quilt that is patterned in our Quilts From Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Spring ’17 special issue.

Hi everyone! I’m Kay Mackenzie, a designer and author in Santa Cruz, California. My website is By Kay Mackenzie, which has all of my books and patterns on it, plus select notions for the appliqué enthusiast. I also have a site dedicated to appliqué, all kinds. You’ll find a wealth of information at All About Appliqué, so take your time clicking around the categories, and use the keyword search as well.

For awhile now I’ve been making pieced fabric compositions and then cutting appliqués out of them. It gives appliqué an extra twinkle, and uses up scraps… win/win!

Pieces of Flora came from my block Make Beleaf in Volume 13 of 100 Blocks.

km image1 Pieces of Flora: A Visit with Kay Mackenzie

Make Beleaf block

The design was inspired by the famous and beloved quilt by Susan McCord, Trailing Vines, which is in The Henry Ford Museum. Here’s a closeup of her fantastical leaves (photo courtesy of the museum). I have passionately loved and admired the inclusion of red and blue.

trailing vines Pieces of Flora: A Visit with Kay Mackenzie

Trailing Vines | The Henry Ford

I sewed together strip sets and then cut the leaves out of them. Of course you can use all sorts of different colors, solids or prints, and the leaves can be used in a million different ways.

For the wall hanging design in Quilts From 100 Blocks, I filled in the negative space with additional gently curving branches, and added simple borders to make the flora the star. Tricia Patterson did a fabulous job making the quilt! And how did she know… I love scrappy bindings!

flora quilt Pieces of Flora: A Visit with Kay Mackenzie

Pieces of Flora quilt

I hope you enjoy making our own version of Pieces of Flora. It will look great on your wall and remind you of the many colors of nature all year long.

kay mackenzie Pieces of Flora: A Visit with Kay Mackenzie

* * *

Thank you for joining us today, Kay!

If you’d like to make Pieces of Flora and don’t have a copy of our Quilts From Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Spring ’17 issue, print and digital copies are available in our online store. 

digital pattern is also available for Pieces of Flora.

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New Issue: Quiltmaker May/June ’17

QM100517 New Issue: Quiltmaker May/June 17

On the cover: Can You Find It? designed by Diane Harris

The May/June ’17 issue of Quiltmaker hits newsstands next week, and there is so much to love inside this edition! There is, as always, a great selection of quilt patterns — including scrap quilts, a fun I Spy quilt and more. There’s also a fabulous Bonnie Hunter block and more great quilting motifs. And, we also have a few “extra” things in this issue we’re so excited to share with you! We are kicking off two new series that will introduce you to quilting on a domestic or longarm quilting machine. We have helpful hints for designing with pre-cuts. Plus, we have another all-new feature to help you design quilts YOUR way: coloring pages for some designs so you can plan your own color palettes!

Let’s take a closer look at some of the great quilts inside this new issue:

QMK17062 New Issue: Quiltmaker May/June 17

Skip to My Lou quilt pattern

Skip to My Lou: Sharon Parcel combined a traditional block with playful modern fabric prints to create this happy throw quilt. The design is made up of easy-to-piece 6″ blocks and the finished size is 57″ x 63″. (We’ve also included several alternate size options with the pattern if you’d prefer to make it another size.) A kit is available for a limited time.

QMK17061 New Issue: Quiltmaker May/June 17

Highland Roses quilt pattern

Highland Roses: Create an elegant and timeless quilt with this new pattern from Wendy Sheppard. Large 14″ blocks and an on-point setting make this quilt easy to create. The finished size is 80″ x 80″ and a time-saving kit is available for a limited time.

QMK17063 New Issue: Quiltmaker May/June 17

Forest Floor quilt pattern

Forest Floor: The colors of nature come to life on this striking quilt designed by QM editorial assistant Kelly Eisinger. Kelly used batiks in a variety of colors to create her quilt — easily plan your own color palette with the coloring page included in the magazine. The finished size of the quilt is 62″ x 80″. A kit is also available for a limited time.

DPQMP170610 New Issue: Quiltmaker May/June 17

Pinwheel Giggles quilt pattern

Pinwheel Giggles: If you’re looking for a sweet baby quilt, don’t miss this adorable pattern from Eileen Fowler. The design features simple pieced blocks in a medallion setting. Whip it up quickly to create a special gift. Finished size is 46 1/2″ x 46 1/2″.

Browse our online gallery to preview all the quilt patterns included in this issue.

Be sure to keep an eye out for the issue at newsstands, or grab a print or digital edition in our online store. Better yet, subscribe to Quiltmaker and never miss an issue.

Happy Quilting,
Natalie

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A Pattern Is Just a Place to Begin

Budding Blossoms: A Visit with Anne Wiens

anne wiens A Pattern Is Just a Place to Begin

Today we’re excited to welcome designer Anne Wiens as a guest blogger on Quilty Pleasures! Anne is going to tell us all about her Budding Blossoms medallion quilt that is patterned in our Quilts From Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Spring ’17 special issue.

Anne was a member of our 2013 Scrap Squad, and we are big fans of her wonderful quilt designs. Be sure to stop by her blog at Seams Like a Plan for more tips and inspiration.

 

My contribution to Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks, Vol. 14 was a block I called Star Route.

QM100 WIEN 300x300 A Pattern Is Just a Place to Begin

Star Route by Anne Wiens

I live in a rural area of northcentral Montana, where many farms and ranches have their mail delivered by independent couriers contracted by the U.S. Postal Service to deliver along “star routes.”  I did a little research into the name Star Route for my blog post celebrating the 100 Blocks issue last fall.

In that post, I also showed one way to use the block in a simple setting to make a colorful quilt in a couple of sizes.

 

For the Spring ’17 issue of Quilts from Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks, I enlarged the 12″ block to 24″, and added four 12″ blocks around it, then finished with a 9″ wide border and cornerstones.

Star Route Quilt Sketch 300x300 A Pattern Is Just a Place to Begin

Star Route quilt sketch by Anne Wiens

My original proposal was to make the quilt in solids … a nod to the Amish-style quilts I have always enjoyed. When the Quiltmaker editors sent me Kathy Deggendorfer’s “Wild by Nature” collection (Maywood Studios), it took me a little by surprise.  I love the whole line, but that’s a lot of pattern and color for one little quilt. Working with Quiltmaker’s editorial team has nudged me (read “shoved me”) out of my comfort zone on a few occasions, and usually with amazing results like this:

 

Budding Blossoms quilt flat 600 A Pattern Is Just a Place to Begin

Budding Blossoms quilt by Anne Wiens

I’ve always considered a pattern just a place to start, so let’s look at a few ways you could tweak Star Route:

Idea 11 300x171 A Pattern Is Just a Place to Begin

Idea 2 300x171 A Pattern Is Just a Place to BeginIdea 3 300x171 A Pattern Is Just a Place to Begin

There are many more possibilities, of course, so don’t be shy. Pull out your scrap bin and play around with different color combinations. You’ll have enough blocks for a sampler quilt before you know it!

To borrow a phrase from an old commercial, never quit asking “what if”.

* * *

Thank you for joining us today, Anne!

If you’d like to make Budding Blossoms and don’t have a copy of our Quilts From Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Spring ’17 issue, print and digital copies are available in our online store. 

digital pattern is also available for Budding Blossoms.

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10 Happy Quilts for Kids

happy quilts 10 Happy Quilts for Kids

Quilters love to make quilts for kids. From sweet baby quilts to bright and colorful designs for little ones, there is no shortage of adorable patterns you can make for children. But, you’d be hard-pressed to find a cuter, more imaginative collection of children’s quilts than those featured in the book Happy Quilts! by Antonie Alexander. Featuring 10 whimsical, kid-themed quilts (and coordinating soft toys for each quilt), this book features cats, dogs, robots, superheroes, princesses and more!

Antonie is an Australian designer who has been sewing since she was a child. “When my children were born, I started making fun, happy quilts and soft toys for them,” she says in the book’s introduction. “I was thrilled to see them dragging their quilts and soft toys around, making blanket forts to play in, snuggling with them when they were sleepy or sick. It never mattered if they got dirty; a quick cycle in the washing machine and they were clean again. My quilts and soft toys are made to be used and, most of all, loved.”

That they are! These quilts are pure joy. But don’t just take my word for it. Look at them:

HappyQuilts dog 10 Happy Quilts for Kids

Hound Dogs quilt

Hound Dogs quilt: How cute are these happy hound dogs? The blocks are all similar, but all the little details (the bones, the stars, the spots, the fun fabric choices) make each one look so unique! And the coordinating Hound Dog soft toy is sure to have a special spot in any child’s toy collection. The finished size of the quilt is 56 1/2″ x 72 1/2″.

HappyQuilts Sea 10 Happy Quilts for Kids

The Deep Blue Sea quilt

The Deep Blue Sea quilt: Happy fish of various sizes swim through the deep blue sea on this magical quilt. Make the coordinating Mermaid and Merboy soft toys for some make-believe underwater fun. The finished size of the quilt is 55 1/2″ x 55 1/2″.

HappyQuilts Superheroes 10 Happy Quilts for Kids

Bedtime Superheroes quilt

Bedtime Superheroes quilt: What little one doesn’t dream of being a superhero? This darling quilt design features a whole host of heroes, plus there are coordinating Superboy and Supergirl Bedtime Superhero soft toys. Finished size of the quilt is 58 1/2″ x 58 1/2″.

happy quilts farm 10 Happy Quilts for Kids

Windy Hill Farm quilt

Windy Hill Farm quilt: Sheep, pigs, chickens, horses and more – the gang’s all here on this farm-themed quilt! A pinwheel border completes the design and the coordinating Penny the Pig soft toy is sure to bring smiles. The quilt finishes at 60 1/2″ x 72 1/2″.

HappyQuilts Bear2 10 Happy Quilts for Kids

Snuggle Bears quilt

Snuggle Bears quilt: Every little one needs a teddy bear to snuggle with — why not make a whole quilt of snuggly bears and the soft toy? As with all the quilts in this book, the details are adorable. Some of the bears have bows, some have glasses, some have bees buzzing around them as they try to get some honey! The quilt finishes at 55 1/2″ x 55 1/2″.

HappyQuilts Race 10 Happy Quilts for Kids

Speedy Racers quilt

Speedy Racers quilt: Kids who love anything with wheels are sure to adore this fun race car quilt. Four-patch blocks combine with appliqué stars and speedy cars to create the cute design. The coordinating soft toy for this one is a Speedy Racer. Is there anything Antonie didn’t think of when designing these cute quilts? Finished size is 57 1/2″ x 60 1/2″.

HappyQuilts WildThings 10 Happy Quilts for Kids

Wild Things quilt

Wild Things quilt: The friendly “monsters” on this quilt and soft toy are sure to spark some imaginative play time. The finished size of the quilt is 54 1/2″ x 54 1/2″.

HappyQuilts pincesses 10 Happy Quilts for Kids

Tiny Princesses quilt

Tiny Princesses quilt: For the little princess in your life, make this royally cute quilt featuring 16 unique, tiny princesses. And don’t forget the Tiny Princess soft toys — choose from two different princesses, or make them both. Finished size is 60 1/2″ x 60 1/2″.

HappyQuilts Kitty 10 Happy Quilts for Kids

Purrfectly Pretty Kitties quilt

Purrfectly Pretty Kitties quilt: Cat lovers of all ages will adore this quilt. Pretty kitties play in a garden of flowers and nine patch quilts, and the coordinating Miss Kitty soft toy makes the perfect feline companion. The finished size of the quilt is 63″ x 75 1/2″.

HappyQuilts Robots 10 Happy Quilts for Kids

Little Robots quilt

Little Robots quilt: Happy retro-inspired robots are featured on the last quilt pattern and coordinating soft toy in the book. Did you notice the dog and cat robots hiding on the first two rows? Too precious! The finished size of this quilt is 55 1/2″ x 67 1/2″.

The projects are easy to make and ideal for confident beginners and experienced sewists alike. Patterns and templates for all the quilts and soft toys are included with the book, as well as quilting, piecing, appliqué and finishing instructions. Antonie also shares techniques for successful quilt and soft toy making, a guide to fusible web appliqué, stitching techniques, embroidery stitches and more. Plus, she has lots of quick tips sprinkled throughout the book to help you through your happy quilting journey.

Ready to start creating? Learn more about Happy Quilts! in our online shop.

Happy Quilting,
Natalie

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