100 Things Every Quilter Should Do

 100 Things Every Quilter Should Do

Recently I ran across an online list called “100 Books to Read Before You Die.” I didn’t wholly agree with the list (I mean—Bridget Jones’s Diary. Seriously?), but after a few clicks I discovered that there were also lists of places to travel, movies to see, candies to try and beers to drink. (Really? There are 100 kinds of beer? I have to get out more.)

beer 100 Things Every Quilter Should Do

But anyway, all these lists got me to thinking, and I decided to come up with my very own list.

100 Things Every Quilter
Should Do Before She Dies

MH900427329 100 Things Every Quilter Should Do

  1. Visit a quilt shop.
  2. Make a Nine Patch.
  3. Make a Log Cabin.
  4. Label a quilt.
  5. Figure yardage for a quilt.
  6. Learn about warp and weft.
  7. Use a rotary cutter.
  8. Use templates.
  9. Paper piece a quilt block.
  10. Hand applique a quilt block.
  11. Make a yo-yo.
  12. Embellish a quilt.
  13. Try free motion quilting.
  14. Stitch in the ditch.

    gqs5 100 Things Every Quilter Should Do

    You’re never too old to try something new!

  15. Try hand quilting.
  16. Bind a quilt.
  17. Miter the corners of quilt binding.
  18. Join the ends of quilt binding.
  19. Sew diagonal seams.
  20. Use a walking foot.
  21. Attend a guild meeting.
  22. Visit Houston for International Quilt Festival.
  23. Have a quilt appraised.
  24. Visit a quilt museum.
  25. Go on a quilt retreat.
  26. Try curved piecing.
  27. Miter the borders.
  28. Learn to do blanket stitch by hand.
  29. See a local quilt show.

    quilt show 2 100 Things Every Quilter Should Do

    Attend a local quilt show to learn and enjoy.

  30. Put your quilt in a local quilt show.
  31. Sell raffle tickets on a quilt.
  32. Take a road trip with quilt friends.
  33. Create a Pinterest board with quilts.
  34. Make a 3-D quilt block.
  35. Donate a quilt to a good cause.
  36. Make a sampler quilt.
  37. Make an art quilt.
  38. Try bobbin work.
  39. Learn to maintain your sewing machine.

    k4384193 100 Things Every Quilter Should Do

    Learn to maintain your sewing machine.

  40. Add rickrack to a quilt.
  41. Design a quilt. (Remember, you don’t necessarily have to make the quilt!)
  42. Change/tweak/alter a pattern to make it your own.
  43. Make a color wheel with fabric swatches.
  44. Chat about quilting with a stranger.
  45. Go on a blog tour.
  46. Give a quilt as a wedding/graduation/retirement gift.
  47. Visit Paducah during the AQS Show.
  48. Take a class with a nationally known teacher.
  49. Use some fabric you dislike.

    yoogly10 100 Things Every Quilter Should Do

    Anita Grossman Solomon didn’t care for this cat fabric celebrating the new Millenium.

  50. Participate in Show & Tell.
  51. Volunteer for a job in a quilt group.
  52. Use a color you detest.
  53. Make a quilt inspired by nature.
  54. Get up early to quilt or stay up late to quilt.
  55. Make a scrap quilt.
  56. Make a tote bag.
  57. Make a postcard quilt.
  58. Make a baby quilt and gift it to a newborn.
  59. Understand the basics of caring for quilts.
  60. Borrow a quilting book from the public library.
  61. Teach someone else to quilt.
  62. Creatively piece a backing for one of your quilts.

    pieced quilt back4 100 Things Every Quilter Should Do

    Julie Herman at Jaybird Quilts sometimes pieces her quilt backs.

  63. Apply a piped binding, or some variation of it.
  64. Post quilt pics to Facebook.
  65. Install quilty wallpaper on your computer.
  66. Put a quilty bumper sticker on your car.
  67. Cuss mildly when you realize you’ve been sewing air (because you ran out of bobbin thread)
  68. Read your sewing machine manual cover to cover.
  69. Learn to thread baste.
  70. Learn to pin baste.
  71. Use basting spray.
  72. Help a friend make a quilt.
  73. Make a quilt for a special child.
  74. Make a quilt for a spouse or partner.
  75. Make a quilt for a friend.
  76. Include your quilts in your will (i.e. who gets them).
  77. Determine your favorite thread for piecing.
  78. Understand the concept of value.
  79. Understand the mathematics of quilt blocks.
  80. Apply a bias binding.
  81. Take a guild speaker to dinner.
  82. Comment on a quilt-related blog post.

    comments 100 Things Every Quilter Should Do

    Leaving a comment on a blog post is easy and fun!

  83. Make a mystery quilt.
  84. Take part in a block exchange.
  85. Write how-to instructions for making a quilt block.
  86. Watch a quilting video.
  87. Know the difference between lengthwise and crosswise grain.
  88. Know the parts of a sewing machine needle and why they matter.
  89. Organize your stash.
  90. Know the names of hand sewing needles used for different tasks.
  91. Finish a UFO.
  92. Purchase fabric on impulse.
  93. Try sewing with precuts.
  94. Trade fabrics with quilt friends.
  95. Identify your ancestors who quilted.
  96. Visit a quilt shop while on vacation.

    Singer Treadle Machine 100 Things Every Quilter Should Do

    Treadling is enjoying a comeback.

  97. Sew on a treadle for old time’s sake.
  98. Subscribe to a quilting magazine.
  99. Become a regular reader of a quilting blog.
  100. Go on a Shop Hop.

These are just my ideas. Maybe yours are different. I’d love to hear what things you think should be added to the list, or left off. When you think about all the things you’ve already done, can you see how much quilting has enriched your life? Isn’t it wonderful?

Get a printer-friendly version of the list, with checkboxes, so you can get started, and please leave a comment with your own ideas for the list.

About Diane Harris

I'm Interactive Editor for Quiltmaker magazine in Golden, Colorado, USA. For six years, I've been writing pattern instructions and product reviews, and doing a host of other tasks necessary to help produce a national pattern magazine. Now I work remotely from rural Nebraska to generate some of our online content. I manage the QM Scrap Squad, our blog tours and our Quilt-Alongs. I have one of the best jobs in the world.
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118 Responses to 100 Things Every Quilter Should Do

  1. Pingback: 100 Things Every Quilter Should Do in Their Lifetime | The Quilted Edge

  2. Rachel H says:

    I would add:
    > Make a hexagon quilt.
    > Make a completely hand-sewn quilt.
    > Buy a quilting gadget and learn how to use it to make a new style of quilt.
    … oh, and don’t 92 too often!

  3. Pingback: March Newsletter 2014 | Silver Comet Stitchers

  4. Merciful Sinkowski says:

    There are only a handful of things on your list that I have not done. A few hold no interest to me, and if I revisit my will anytime soon, maybe I will bequeath my quilts to someone. I am always giving them away, so it is difficult to say which ones I will still have at the end. I don’t believe I have ever posted on a blog before, so this will be a first.

  5. Ruth Williams says:

    Love the scrappy zigzags and would love a working treadle machine.

  6. Judi Osburn says:

    THAT’S MY MOTHER WEARING THE JACKET I MADE HER WITH ALL HER FAVORITE THINGS FABRICS. YOU GO LINA.

  7. Shelly J McIntosh says:

    Well, more than a few of these don’t apply to me as I only make quilts by hand. Some great ideas though.

  8. Janet says:

    I have only 11 more to do. Great list. Add: “Teach a child to quilt.”

    • Jane Mckay says:

      Janet; One of the most satisfying things about my being a quilter is that I have given free quilting classes to the girls and ladies in my church. We now have umpteen quilters who band together frequently to have a “Quiltathon” and make charity quilts. My latest child quilter has finished her first quilt, a 9patch with setting squares and is “itching” to get on to the sampler. She’s so excited, and doing a great job. She has two other fellow students as well who are older. We have real fun!!!

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