How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey

Quiltmaker’s Scrap Squad is a select group of talented readers who take one pattern from each issue and make scrap quilts to inspire you. Today we continue our posts featuring a quilt from Quiltmaker’s Nov/Dec issue.

QM scrap squadB3 How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey

This is Christmas Ribbons, designed by Carolyn Beam. The fabrics are Chalkboard Christmas by Melissa Ybarra for Windham Fabrics.

QMMP 141200 CB 5061 How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey

Christmas Ribbons, designed by Carolyn Beam and made by Hatty Brown. Fabric: Chalkboard Christmas by Melissa Ybarra for Windham Fabrics. Batting: The Warm Company. Quilted on an HQ24 Fusion by Handi Quilter.

You’ll find the pattern in the Nov/Dec issue of Quiltmaker, on newsstands now. The digital pattern is also available as a single from quiltandsewshop.com.

QMMP 141200 cover 500 How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey

Plenty of holiday and scrap quilt patterns are inside Quiltmaker’s Nov/Dec ’14 issue!

Today’s scrap quilt is by Emily Bailey is from Centerville, Utah.

emilycropped copy 218x300 How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey

Emily Bailey

She blogs regularly at Em’s Scrapbag. You’ll hear from Emily in her own words below.

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I wanted a really scrappy look in this quilt. I decided on a background of black and white prints and then really scrappy blocks.

DSCN0735 300x225 How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey

To make the quilt blocks I grabbed my bin of bits and I “made” fabric from them. I was inspired by Victoria Findlay Wolfe’s method and tutorial.

DSCN0744 300x225 How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey

Using the made fabric I constructed both sets of blocks.

DSCN0838 300x225 How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey DSCN0840 300x225 How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey

 

I auditioned white backgrounds in the smaller squares.

DSCN0841 225x300 How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey

But eventually I decided I liked the way it looked with the black surrounding it.

DSCN0842 300x225 How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey

Because I felt I had gotten too busy with the black and white prints I decided to go with a solid black for the sashing and borders. If I’d had time I would have ripped the black prints out and made them solid also. But time was an issue, so I have a very busy quilt center.

DSCN0846 300x225 How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey

I thought of a black binding but decided against it. If I’m going to be scrappy, might as well go all out. I made a scrappy binding, for which I have a tutorial. I just love how a scrappy binding looks. All those pretty colors swirling around.

DSCN0871 300x225 How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey

Plus I think it looks pretty nice with the black border.

emilysfinish How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey

Emily’s finished scrap quilt

Even though I went a little overboard with the scrappy middle, I still really like my scrappy quilt.

~Emily~

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You’ll find terrific scrap quilt patterns inside Devoted to Scraps, Quiltmaker’s very own scrap quilt manual. Inside are 13 quilts you’ll make over and over, because with scraps, no two will ever be alike!

LA6046 How to Make a Scrap Quilt: Emily Bailey

Devoted to Scraps comes in hard copy or ebook versions. It’s one of Quiltmaker’s very best!

 

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Quilt Exchanges: Types, Tips and More

cbheadshot 150x150 Quilt Exchanges: Types, Tips and More

Carolyn Beam

My family and I have lived in several different states, and in each one I’ve searched out the friendship of fellow quilters. One of the best parts of belonging to quilt groups is participating in different exchanges. I’ve participated in round robins and have exchanged everything from fabric (strips, squares and fat quarters) to blocks to rows—all different, and oh so fun!

 

One of the first things I exchanged was 2 1/2″ fabric strips. Everyone received five identical strips of plaid fabric from each participant. This was before there were ready-made pre-cut strips—how easy would that have been?! By cutting the strips in half lengthwise, there was enough to make this Log Cabin quilt.

Log Cabin2 Quilt Exchanges: Types, Tips and More

Log Cabin

Just for fun, I cut applique shapes using cookie cutters for a border.

One of our exchanges was rows. We each specified a theme and row width and didn’t get to see our rows until the grand unveiling. I started mine with a row of lighthouses and received some very creative rows! One note: the rows weren’t sewn together until the end.

Row Quilt Quilt Exchanges: Types, Tips and More

Row Quilt

For our round robin, we each started with a block for the center. This turned out to be one of my favorites!

Round Robin Quilt Exchanges: Types, Tips and More

Round Robin

Here are a couple of block exchanges. And, yes, these still need to be put into quilts!

Red and white1 Quilt Exchanges: Types, Tips and More

Red and White blocks

Patriotic Quilt Exchanges: Types, Tips and More

Patriotic blocks

Exchanges don’t have to be with groups of people. One of mine was with just one quilt friend. We each made 4″ blocks (two of each so we could share one). I’m setting mine into an 8″ Evening Star and then adding a 1″ finished border.

4 squares Quilt Exchanges: Types, Tips and More

4″ squares

I exchanged 3″ Pinwheels with co-workers over the course of several months. I set mine into 6″ Pinwheel blocks for this quilt that I just love!

Pinwheel Party Quilt Exchanges: Types, Tips and More

Pinwheel Party

It’s called Pinwheel Party. You can find the pattern in Quiltmaker, March/April ’09.

And, finally. I loved Paula Stoddard’s Peppermint Candy from our Nov/Dec ’13 issue. This is a great quilt for which to exchange squares of fabric with friends, but I just made this one myself. The pattern is included in a brand new ebook called Red and White Quilts. Three great patterns for just $7.99.

Peppermint Candy Quilt Exchanges: Types, Tips and More

Peppermint Candy

Although quilt exchanges are a lot of fun, they can also lead to disappointment if the “rules” aren’t clearly spelled out at the beginning. Here are a few guidelines for successful exchanges:

  1. Set a reasonable time frame for each part of the exchange.
  2. Specify the type of fabrics—traditional, batiks, plaids, reproduction, etc. Exchange only high quality quilting fabrics—and give the type of fabrics you want to receive.
  3. If exchanging blocks, choose an easy-to-sew quilt block. Determine the number of blocks to exchange during each time period.
  4. Spell out any considerations clearly, such as which way to press seams, special techniques to be used and whether fabrics should be prewashed or not.

I hope you’re inspired to try an exchange with your quilty friends. If you’re not part of a local group, you can find exchange groups online. And if you have participated in an exchange, I’d love to hear from you. What did you exchange? How did it work? Leave me a comment and let me know! Maybe we can create a future blog post with more exchange ideas based on your experiences.

If you’d like to send us photos, email editor@quiltmaker.com. We hope to hear from you.

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Other quilt patterns perfect for exchanges:

25623 pattern img Quilt Exchanges: Types, Tips and More

Wanderlust by Bonnie Hunter for Quiltmaker

Wanderlust by Bonnie Hunter for Quiltmaker’s July/August ’14 issue. Digital pattern available.

LA6046 Quilt Exchanges: Types, Tips and More

Devoted to Scraps gives you creative ideas to turn fabric bits into beauties.

Quiltmaker’s Devoted to Scraps book is a must-have if you love scrap quilts. They’d all be perfect for exchanging fabric with friends!

Posted in QM Issues, Quilty Lifestyle | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Quiltmaker’s Treasure Hunt Contest

Please note: This contest is open to U.S. residents only.

Quiltmaker’s Treasure Hunt contest is in full swing. I hope you’ll take a moment to enter. Start with a copy of Quiltmaker’s Nov/Dec issue. The advertisements from sponsors contain clues to help you find the buttons.

TreasHunt14 contest Quiltmakers Treasure Hunt Contest

Enter Quiltmaker’s Treasure Hunt today.

Entering is easier now but you still have to search a little for the buttons on sponsor sites—that’s why it’s called a Treasure Hunt! Find complete details on Treasure Hunt.

Today we’re highlighting several Treasure Hunt sponsors and their products.

 timeless Quiltmakers Treasure Hunt Contest

Timeless Treasures Fabrics are always a welcome addition. I poked around their website to see what’s new.

Florentine Quilt Quiltmakers Treasure Hunt Contest

Tonga Firestorm”Florentine” is a free pattern on the Timeless Treasures website.

Tonga Firestorm “Florentine” is a free pattern they offer. It uses Tonga Firestorm by Judy and Judel Niemeyer. The quilt is by Jessica VanDenburgh of Sew Many Creations.

Gail C3125 Pink Quiltmakers Treasure Hunt Contest

Piglets from Babes in Farmland from Timeless Treasures

I’m also smitten with this “Piglets” print from the Babes in Farmland collection. I’m a farm girl and believe it or not, pigs paid for my college education. I’m a pushover for a cute hog.

You’ll want to check out the many terrific fabric collections at Timeless Treasures.

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logo Quiltmakers Treasure Hunt Contest

Have you seen all the new products at Sulky recently? I was impressed. Quilters are always interested in cotton thread, among other types, and Sulky boasts 64 all new solid colors in 30 weight and 12 weight, plus 80 new 12 weight 50-yard cotton petites.

dresden 20 Quiltmakers Treasure Hunt Contest

Visit Sulky’s new blog for inspiration.

Sulky has a new blog, too. You’ll find lots of inspiration there!

There’s plenty of time to find all of the Treasure Hunt buttons, so please take your time and enjoy the process. There is so much to discover along the way.

~Diane~

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We’ve just released a new ebook of three charming red and white quilts!

DPQMB1501 Quiltmakers Treasure Hunt Contest

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Fast Quilts for Fall and Halloween

If you’re looking for some autumn inspiration, today I’ve gathered up some fall quilt projects to consider. Several are quick quilts that can be made from scraps, and some are free.

0434.leaves 2D00 on 2D00 grass 5F00 2web Fast Quilts for Fall and Halloween

Stitched Pigma Pen Leaves by Natalya Aikens

Try something different—make stitched leaves! Find complete instructions on Quilting Daily. They can be strewn across a fall tabletop or used as place cards for Thanksgiving dinner. I can see them filling up a little basket!

robbingpeter Fast Quilts for Fall and Halloween

Robbing Peter to Pay Jack

Quiltmaker’s most popular fall pattern ever is Robbing Peter to Pay Jack. If you have back issues, see Sept/Oct 2005. This pattern features an easy sew-and-switch technique and fusible applique, done in a flash! Get the pattern in print or digital format (which lets you start instantly).

JackOLantern pattern 5F00 WEB Fast Quilts for Fall and Halloween

Quickie free Jack-o-Lantern banner pattern!

How about a cute quickie Halloween banner? It’s fast fused to hang up in a heartbeat. Find the free pattern and complete instructions from our friends at Quilting Daily.

 

Boo tacular 300px Fast Quilts for Fall and Halloween

Boo-tacular: FREE Halloween Appliqué Wall Quilt Pattern

Make a Boo-tacular Halloween wall quilt from this free pattern. It’s sure to bring the little goblins to your door. It’s from our friends at McCall’s Quilting.

oldgory Fast Quilts for Fall and Halloween

Old “Gory” by Jill Montgomery

Two years ago, Jill Montgomery was on Quiltmaker’s Scrap Squad, and she made Old Gory (not a typo) from a patriotic quilt pattern we published in our July/August ’12 issue. It’s a great idea for a simple Halloween quilt from scraps or strips you have on hand!

 

7755 pattern img Fast Quilts for Fall and Halloween

Any Witch Way can be found in our Sept/Oct 2009 issue.

Another very popular pattern you can revisit if you have back issues is Any Witch Way from Sept/Oct 2009. We fell in love with this twist on a traditional quilt block. Get the back issue on sale now for just $2.50. Quite a steal since it contains many other patterns too!

Monster Munchies 300px Fast Quilts for Fall and Halloween

Monster Munchies: FREE Halloween Table Runner Quilt Pattern

And let’s not forget this free table runner pattern: Monster Munchies from McCall’s Quilting will dress up your holiday table in style. Easy, fast and fun!

Have a great time sewing for the season.

Upcoming: A blog hop with all kinds of resources on sewing for Christmas and winter holidays!

~Diane~

 

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Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Quiltmaker’s Scrap Squad is a select group of talented readers who take one pattern from each issue and make scrap quilts to inspire you. Today we begin posts featuring a new Scrap Squad quilt from Quiltmaker’s Nov/Dec issue.

QM scrap squadB3 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

This is Christmas Ribbons, designed by Carolyn Beam. The fabrics are Chalkboard Christmas by Melissa Ybarra for Windham Fabrics.

QMMP 141200 CB 5061 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Christmas Ribbons, designed by Carolyn Beam and made by Hatty Brown. Fabric: Chalkboard Christmas by Melissa Ybarra for Windham Fabrics. Batting: The Warm Company. Quilted on an HQ24 Fusion by Handi Quilter.

You’ll find the pattern in the Nov/Dec issue of Quiltmaker, on newsstands now. The digital pattern is also available as a single from quiltandsewshop.com.

QMMP 141200 cover 500 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Plenty of holiday and scrap quilt patterns are inside Quiltmaker’s Nov/Dec ’14 issue!

Today’s quilt is by Louisa Robertson from Merritt, British Columbia.

Louisacropped copy Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Louisa Robertson

You’ll hear from her in her own words below.

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The process of Christmas Ribbons becoming a Corn Maze included many detours and changes of direction.

The detours began with those 6″ Snowball blocks. They’re perfect to show off a feature fabric as in the original quilt. But for a scrap quilt they presented a challenge. Perhaps I could add the snowball corners to scrappy pieced blocks? Wonky pieced log cabin blocks, just the right size, were at hand.

first blocks Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Maybe this doesn’t work!

I added corners to a few blocks. Hmm—they are very busy and I just don’t like the effect.

Time for a new plan.

9 patch with sashing2 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Colours of the season

The colours of the season led me to a palette using some of the yellow and gold fabrics recently received as a gift. I decided on golds, rich browns, yellow-greens and reddish purples.

fabrics Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Fabrics for Corn Maze

snowball adapted Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Lines added to make a square-in-a-square

Snowball block1 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Snowball Block

But I still had not solved the problem of the large pieces in the snowball blocks.  Turning to my Electric Quilt software, I adapted the block by connecting the ends of the triangles producing a square-in-a-square.

 

 

This new block led to construction challenges because the resulting patches were non-standard, i.e. rotary cutting would involve guesswork between the eighth-inch lines of the ruler. That did not sound like fun, so I printed off a foundation piecing template.

I was able to rough-cut the pieces a bit too large and trim them to exact size as the block was constructed. My freezer paper foundations were re-usable. Three sets were enough to construct all 32 blocks.

block trimmings 300x231 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

The trimmings from the foundation pieced blocks blend the colours nicely.

As I worked I found that my fabrics included plenty of lights and lots of darks, but not enough of the mediums for that inner frame in the block. Raiding the stash of a friend helped fill this gap.

snowball blocks Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

The smaller rectangular snowball units were simple to construct by adding triangles to corners of rectangles—although I was thoroughly sick of stitch-and-flip corners by the time this step was done!

As I played with these blocks in EQ I saw that turning the smaller snowball changed the direction of the design. Adding sashing to the design opened it up, giving more space around the Snowball blocks and creating a path between the blocks.

A dilemma emerged when it was time to decide on the background fabric. My favourite scrap quilts use “Total Scrap.” However, the only colour family in my collection that would accommodate the large area of background fabrics needed was lights/creams. I wanted to use blues to suggest the summer sky behind the corn fields. Finding a good variety in the right value range would be a challenge.

A visit to my LQS confirmed that it would be difficult to gather a stack of blues that would play together gently enough to back up my muted colours. However, on the sale table I found one lovely blue print.  I purchased a generous length and took it home.

background auditions Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Should background be cream? Or blue?

For a few days I wavered back and forth between cream and blue. At last I re-read my teaching notes in which I tell students that scrap-plus-constant is a good way to give unity to a scrappy design, and I convinced myself that yes, I could use this single fabric for background.

A path was created by adding sashing pieces between blocks, some pieced, others plain. Sashing units are the same size as the F units of the smaller snowball block. Strip piecing made the construction simple, and pressing the seams to one side ensured that seams would interlock.

sashing strip pressing 300x220 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Pressing seam allowances in opposite directions makes it easy to match seams.

The components of the quilt barely fit on my design wall.  I sewed them together row by row, carefully checking my “map” to make sure the path through the maze would come out correctly.

blocks on the wall Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Quilt blocks on the design wall

Then it was time to create the maze by filling in the sashing pieces.

sashing added Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Make sure those blocks go in the right direction!

I added simple borders to repeat the colours in the blocks and continue the path out to the edge of the quilt.

quilting paths Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Quilting the pebbled paths

The quilting step gave me an opportunity to play with designs, knowing that my errors and wobbles would not be very visible on the printed fabrics. I practiced “pebbles” in all the areas of the quilt that were the “path” of the maze.

quilting spiral flower 263x300 Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Spiral flowers in the pieced blocks

This took a long time – and lots of thread! I emptied 12 bobbins on that part of the quilting. I outlined the blocks to make them stand out more clearly and quilted a spiral flower design through the pieced blocks.

louisasfinish Scrap Quilt Ideas: Louisa Robertson

Corn Maze, 61″ x 77″

This might be my new favourite quilt!

 

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Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

Now that it’s all said and done, I’m really pleased with Sewful Things, dianeharris Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Patternbelow,
found in Quilts from Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Fall ’14 issue.

But this was a project on which a lot of things went wrong, and in the process, I learned a few useful quilting tricks.

dianesewfulopt Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

Sewful Things, designed and made by Diane Harris for Quilts from Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks, Fall ’14

It’s not the design or the quilt pattern. I was just having one of those weeks. I’m sure you’ve been there!

Today I’m sharing a helpful technique for matching tricky points in quilt blocks, and giving you the free pattern for this Spool quilt block.

pinmatch20 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

This 12″ spool quilt block has some tricky intersections, but with this piecing tip, you can match them perfectly.

First, here’s the important part, which you can also apply to many other quilting projects:

How to join the three sections so the thread and the spool ends match up perfectly, and something just as important,

how to make life easier when they don’t.

pinmatch9 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

The photo above shows the problem you want to avoid. It looks funky if the “thread” is outside the spool. Let me show you how to match those points perfectly. I learned all of this the hard way so you don’t have to!

pinmatch10 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

First we’re going to pin-match the points. Place the spool end unit and the thread unit right sides together. Begin by placing a pin on the diagonal seam of the spool unit, 1/4″ from the raw edge as shown above.

Then place the pin point 1/4″ from the raw edge of the thread unit, right in the seamline as you did before, as shown below.

pinmatch11 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

Leave the placement pin standing straight up. By leaving it standing, the patches stay in place and are not disturbed or shifted.

pinmatch12 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

With the placement pin standing up, pin on both sides of it as shown above (red pins).

Remove the white placement pin. Increase the stitch length on your machine to about 3.5 mm or as long as you can. Sew just a short section as shown below, about 1.5 inches.

pinmatch13 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

Remove the pins and check to be sure the points match as you wish. If they do not, take out the stitches and repeat the process. Because the stitches are very long, they come out easily! YAY! Do the same thing with the other end of the spool unit so that it matches too.

pinmatch14 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

Once the intersections match to your satisfaction, increase the stitch length to 2.0 mm (my standard for piecing) and sew the entire seam. Repeat for the other end.

pinmatch15 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

I can’t tell you how many times I sewed the entire seam with tiny stitches and had it come out badly while I was making Sewful Things. Somewhere around the fifth try, the light bulb came on. I’ve been sewing for 45 years and I felt entirely silly when I realized that there was an easier way.

pinmatch201 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

So next time you have tricky intersections, use pin-matching, lengthen the stitches, and sew only that portion until you’re happy with it.

Now here’s the free block pattern I promised.

pinmatch1 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

These are the pieces you’ll need for the Spool quilt block.

For this 12″ finished Spool quilt block, you’ll need these patches:

  • Spool fabric (light brown): 2 at 3″ x 12.5″
  • Thread fabric (stripe): 1 at 7.5″ x 7.5″
  • Background fabric (white): 4 at 3″ x 3″ and 2 at 3″ x 7.5″

You’ll use the stitch-and-flip method to create the spool ends.

pinmatch2 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

The Fons & Porter quarter-inch seam marker has been well worth the money I spent. I use it all the time.

Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of each 3″ background square. I have always used a regular ruler for this, but not long ago I got the Fons & Porter Quarter Inch Seam Marker and oh my, what a difference it has made. I should have gotten this years ago.

Mark all four of the 3″ background squares on the diagonal. Be sure to place the ruler ever-so-slightly to the side of the diagonal, so that the line you draw is actually right on the diagonal center. I used a mechanical pencil for marking these.

pinmatch3 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

Mark all four of the 3″ background squares on the diagonal center.

 

Place a marked square at the end of one light brown rectangle as shown below.

pinmatch6b Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

Place a 3″ background square at the end of a light brown rectangle to prepare for stitch-and-flip.

I used a “leader” of blue fabric to help the machine get started without eating the patch corners.

pinmatch4 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

You can use a “leader” to help avoid the patches being sucked down into the throat plate opening.

Sew along the diagonal line, just a hair to the side of the drawn line (closer to the corner that will be trimmed away).

pinmatch5 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

I sewed just a smidge to the right side of the marked line so that the patch will fold over exactly down its diagonal center.

After the seam is complete, trim away the white patch as shown below, leaving a 1/4″ seam allowance. Leave the entire light brown patch in place.

pinmatch6 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

Trim away the white patch as shown, leaving a 1/4″ seam allowance.

Press the white patch open. Repeat for the other end, orienting the seams as mirror images so you get the effect of spool ends. Make two spool end units.

pinmatch7 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

Open out the white patch and press gently.

Sew the white rectangles to the sides of the striped patch as shown below, noticing the orientation of the stripes.

pinmatch8 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

Spool end units and thread unit, ready to be joined.

Use pin-matching and longer stitches to perfectly match the tricky areas of the thread and spool units. Then finish joining the three sections to complete the block.

Next time you have tricky intersections to match, you’ll be ready with this method.

Happy Quilting!

~Diane

 

 

 

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Get Quilts from Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Fall ’14 issue and make Sewful Things for yourself!

QMMS 140048 cover 375opt Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

Quilts from Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Fall ’14

Another item you might like:

turtles 300x298 Better Piecing: A Perfect Match; Free Quilt Block Pattern

Totally Turtles quilt kit; fabrics by Studio E.

 

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Help Us Choose the Best Quilt Designs

Quiltmaker is planning an issue featuring readers’ favorite QM designs over the years. But we need to know what quilts you’ve enjoyed the most. We’d love to hear from you.

littlegirlwriting Help Us Choose the Best Quilt Designs

We’d love to hear from you!

What quilts have you made? What designs have you loved? Are there QM projects still on your gotta-make list? Please let us know. You may leave comments on this post or send us email: editor@quiltmaker.com. Please put “Reader Favorites” in the subject line.

This would be a great time to pull out your back issues and thumb through them. You’ll be reminded of what has intrigued you. Thank you for your input!

Posted in Scrapbag | Tagged | 9 Comments

Christmas Quilts, Christmas Stockings and More

Quiltmaker’s Nov/Dec issue appears on newsstands today, and most dianeharris Christmas Quilts, Christmas Stockings and More
subscribers should have it already. This issue is chock-full of great
quilts. Let me show you around!

QMMP 141200 cover 200 Christmas Quilts, Christmas Stockings and More

Great Christmas and holiday quilts are inside Quiltmaker’s new issue!

December Daze is all decked out to grace the cover. Its Northcott quilting fabrics are perfect, aren’t they?

QMMP 141200 daze 506 Christmas Quilts, Christmas Stockings and More

December Daze by Eileen Fowler; fabrics by Northcott.

Eileen Fowler’s design features easy piecing and block construction. Blocks are set in diagonal rows—wouldn’t that be a great new skill to learn? It’s not hard, and it opens up new possibilities for your quilts. We have convenient quilt kits for December Daze, too.

turtles Christmas Quilts, Christmas Stockings and More

Totally Turtles by Heidi Pridemore; fabrics by Studio E.

If you’re in the market for a small quilt, Totally Turtles by Heidi Pridemore features a bale (that’s official language for a group of turtles!) swimming happily along. The plaid fabrics from Studio E are wonderful. A time-saving kit will have you sewing in no time!

QMMP 141200 POLAR 506 Christmas Quilts, Christmas Stockings and More

Peppermint Polar Bear; wool from Weeks Dye Works.

Maybe you have a quilting friend for whom you’d like to make a special gift. Our Peppermint Polar Bear features wool from Weeks Dye Works, buttons from Hillcreek Designs, and pins from Just Another Button Company. Step-by-step pictorial instructions guide you to success.

3 stockings Christmas Quilts, Christmas Stockings and More

Piece and Harmony stockings by Diane Harris

Make a quilty Christmas stocking called Piece and Harmony. Use vintage fabrics or pull from your scrap bin! The cuff looks great in reproduction fabrics, or if you’re lucky enough to own vintage quilting fabric, showcase it here.

 

QMMP 141200 CB 506 Christmas Quilts, Christmas Stockings and More

Christmas Ribbons by Carolyn Beam; fabrics by Windham Fabrics.

Christmas Ribbons showcases a chalkboard print from Windham Fabrics. Carolyn Beam’s design goes together quickly. It’s just right for highlighting any special print! This design is the Scrap Squad project for this issue; watch for Scrap Squad posts beginning Oct. 17—there will be some terrific scrap quilts!

circleoffriendsbonnie Christmas Quilts, Christmas Stockings and More

Bonnie Hunter writes a scrappy quilt block column for every issue of Quiltmaker.

As always, we have Bonnie Hunter’s Addicted to Scraps quilt block. Circle of Friends is going to make a terrific scrap quilt! If you’re not a subscriber, sign up now so you never miss a Bonnie block.

This is just the tip of the iceberg. More to come next week. Pick up this issue today and start all of your holiday sewing projects!

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More holiday projects to love:

Merry Baskets Christmas tree skirt pattern

 Christmas Quilts, Christmas Stockings and More

Merry Baskets tree skirt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 Days of Christmas pattern, print or digital

08P001 Christmas Quilts, Christmas Stockings and More

12 Days of Christmas quilt pattern

 

Christmas Tweet wall quilt kit

tweet400opt Christmas Quilts, Christmas Stockings and More

Christmas Tweet wall quilt

 

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Quilt Designer Insights: Part 2

Magic Stars is a quilt design by Janice Averill in the Sept/Oct issue of Quiltmaker. It’s a fascinating design with so much potential for different looks. The QM Scrap Squad had a terrific time making scrap quilts from this pattern.

magicstars450opt Quilt Designer Insights: Part 2

Magic Stars, designed by Janice Averill. Fabric: Elementary by Sweetwater for Moda Fabrics.

If you missed it, here’s Part 1 of this post, where Janice shares some of her design secrets with us.

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Here’s more from quilt designer Janice Averill. I’ve interspersed the text with some of her colorations of Magic Stars, all accomplished using Electric Quilt’s quilt design software.

Q: What else can you tell us about working with EQ? How do you use it?

 A: I love working with Electric Quilt (EQ) to create mockups and explore the possibilities of my ideas. If my creative stream goes in different directions from the same spring I’ll save each variation in its own file, using a name & number system, so I don’t get confused.

EQ helps me to keep all my ideas in one place, which in turn makes it easier to return to a stalled idea later once inspiration strikes. It’s also a great resource for current fabrics to visualize my designs. EQ is capable of doing everything I need to develop an idea.

magicstarsquiltgrayscale1 Quilt Designer Insights: Part 2

Magic Stars quilt design in grayscale, version 1

Still I make a habit of using a gridded sketch book for basic design development. That way I’m ready when an idea hits me no matter where I am, because I have my sketch book with me. After I reach a certain point in my sketch book, I go to EQ to explore the possibilities. Before EQ this process would have required a lot of time and resources to render all the ideas I have, and to be able to compare them.

magicstarsquiltgrayscale2 Quilt Designer Insights: Part 2

Magic Stars quilt design in grayscale, version 2

It also helps me with optimal placement of color value in my designs. Understanding color value and how to use it did not come naturally to me. The fabric hues I usually chose for my first quilts were too close in value to make the design pop. So I read many art theory books (both quilting and fine art) to educate myself. From Jinny Beyer’s Color Confidence for Quilters I learned to make a black and white copy of my fabric palette so I can see the relative value of the fabrics. EQ makes this task quick and easy.

magicstarsprimarycolors1 Quilt Designer Insights: Part 2

Magic Stars quilt design in primary colors

I create a vertical strip quilt one block wide horizontally, and with enough blocks vertically to match the choices in my fabric palette. I print this in black ink. I mark the swatches to identify them and then cut them apart.

I sort and resort the swatches to discern the relative value order of the fabrics in my palette. I sort my EQ fabric palette to match the relative value order of my paper and ink swatches. As I mentioned earlier, I create my designs using gray scale values. Since my EQ fabric swatches are ordered by value in my palette, it’s quick & easy to replace the gray tones with fabrics.

magicstarsquiltprimary2 Quilt Designer Insights: Part 2

Magic Stars quilt design in primary colors, version 2

Q: How long have you used the software? What’s the most valuable aspect of it?

A: I’ve been using EQ since 2004. I started with EQ5. The most valuable aspect about EQ for me is my ability to grow as an artist quickly and without using up my precious fabrics. Originally I was a custom designer/dressmaker. I have a degree in fashion design from the Fashion Institute of Technology in Manhattan, NY.

magicstarsquiltparadiseversion Quilt Designer Insights: Part 2

Magic Stars, “Paradise” version

Fashion utilizes color and design a bit differently than quilting does. Quilting is more of a graphic art. Even though I was artistic I knew very little about color theory. EQ is a valuable resource for a graphic design education. It makes it easy to test color and design theories quickly and without wasting precious time and resources. Being a Connecticut Yankee, the thought of “wasting” anything goes against the grain, so to speak.

magicstarsquiltpinkyellow Quilt Designer Insights: Part 2

Magic Stars quilt design, pink and yellow version

The most valuable thing about EQ for me, is that it created an opportunity for me to work from home. Because of EQ I was able to become a quilt designer for Quilting Treasures fabrics and have quilt designs published in Quiltmaker. They are both in other states, so I need quilt design software to develop my ideas and deliver them by e-mail.

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magicstarsquiltlilyversion Quilt Designer Insights: Part 2

Magic Stars quilt design, “Lily” version

It’s easy to see what a valuable tool Electric Quilt is. Don’t these “quilts” look great? Using quilt design software lets you see how different fabrics will work together, saving valuable time and resources.

magicstarsquiltcozumel Quilt Designer Insights: Part 2

Magic Stars, Cozumel version

Maybe it’s time to put Electric Quilt design software on your Christmas list!

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MCB1090 Quilt Designer Insights: Part 2

501 Quilting Motifs for Hand or Machine Quilting

Need quilting designs to finish up your pieced tops? Quiltmaker’s 501 Quilting Motifs fits the bill!

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Quiltmaker Kicks Off Treasure Hunt

This contest is open to residents of the U.S. only. Learn why.

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Quiltmaker’s Treasure Hunt is underway. More than $24,000 in prizes will be awarded to lucky winners. Think quilting fabric, batting, thread, books, notions and more.

TH14 FB 506 Quiltmaker Kicks Off Treasure Hunt

Quiltmaker’s Treasure Hunt has launched.

We’re thrilled to have two grand prizes from two amazing machine companies.

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PFAFF quilt ambition 2.0 sewing machine

One grand prize is the PFAFF® quilt ambition™ 2.0 sewing machine.

The other grand prize is a Handi Quilter Sweet Sixteen sit-down longarm quilting machine.

sweetsixteen Quiltmaker Kicks Off Treasure Hunt

Handi Quilt Sweet Sixteen sit-down longarm quilting machine

In addition to these, we have prizes of thread, fabric, notions, books and batting. Our industry partners make the contest possible:

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No mail-in entries will be accepted. This contest is open to U.S. residents only.
Questions? Please read our Frequently Asked Questions.

 

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