Quilting That Travels Part 5: English Paper Piecing Hexies

1 EPPHexi Quilting That Travels Part 5:  English Paper Piecing HexiesQuilting That Travels Part 5:

English Paper Piecing Hexies

By Tricia Patterson

Quiltmaker Associate Editor

2 and 3 Denise and QM Hexi Quilting That Travels Part 5:  English Paper Piecing Hexies

Denise’s Hexie wall hanging

My first day on the job Paula Stoddard, our Managing Editor, gave me a tour of the F+W Media office space in Golden. We stopped at our Art Director Denise Stark’s office where I saw the most fabulous quilt hanging on the wall. I willingly admit the introduction dallied a bit because I couldn’t take my eyes off her quilt. Later, I discovered the quilt pattern she made, Sonja Callaghan’s design, in Quiltmaker May/June 2013, an issue showcasing modern twists of traditional hexagon quilts. They just aren’t our grandmothers’ hexies any longer.

Since 2013, I’ve found we’ve published many quilt patterns, tutorials and workshops about incorporating these clever shapes in quilting. (I’ve listed a few sources for you at the end of the blog.) I’ve learned there are several new techniques for making a hexagon quilt. For instance, Sonja’s quilt was designed using half-hexies made with shapes cut from fabric strips and plastic templates.

4 LilyHexi Quilting That Travels Part 5:  English Paper Piecing Hexies

Lily’s Grandmother’s Flower Garden quilt

Traditionally, a hexagon quilt was made with the English Paper Piecing (a.k.a. EPP) technique. As a hand quilter, of course I prefer this method. The last hexagon quilt I made was for my granddaughter, using a time-traveled pattern named Grandmother’s Flower Garden. If you look around you will see this pattern everywhere. I frequent antique shops and I almost always see at least one scrappy fabric garden quilt. I recently found the Grandmother’s Flower Garden quilt in the photo at a shop in Golden.

5 AntiqueHexi Quilting That Travels Part 5:  English Paper Piecing Hexies

English Paper Piecing dates back to the early 1700s. As with the hands-on method used today, the technique begins when paper templates are cut to the exact size of a finished patch. Then fabric is basted to the paper pieces. The paper acts as a stabilizer, eliminating the stretching that can occur along all the bias edges. Like foundation piecing, the papers remain in place until all the patches are finished for a quilt. I won’t deny to naysayers that English paper piecing takes extra time, compared to machine quilting. However, it is another great traditional pattern you can work on during a long car trip, or sitting next to your honey in the evening.

I started a quilt for my oldest grandson during a car trip we took last weekend to Kansas City. Benjamin is a very inquisitive 10-year-old with a fascination for math and science. I chose the Science Fair fabric collection designed by Rani Child for Robert Kaufman for his quilt and hexagon patches because they are geometric shapes and remind me of atoms; fabric well-suited to his interests.

Materials and Preparation Before You Go

Buy or make paper templates the desired size of the finished hexagon patch.

6 PaperPieces Quilting That Travels Part 5:  English Paper Piecing Hexies

Our foremothers recycled newspapers for their hexagon patch templates. (I think castaway printer paper is the perfect alternative.)  A real find at an antique shop is to find the paper still attached to a quilt; it was often used instead of batting back in the day. Today, you can buy ready-cut paper templates. You can buy a hexagon ruler like one created by Fons and Porter that includes many sizes you can use for cutting fabric shapes, and as a guide for sizing paper templates. I made a 6” plastic template for Lily’s quilt several years ago. I pulled it out to cut the shapes for Ben’s quilt out of cardstock, and used my new F&P hexagon ruler to cut the fabric. I cut the hexagons from cardstock because it is sturdy enough to allow me to use the paper pieces again several times, saving time to cut all those shapes.

Cut out fabric hexagons.

Many quilters direct you to use a generous 1/4” seam allowance, around all sides of a hexagon paper piece. I like to use 1/2” because it gives me a little more fabric to hold on to when I’m basting it to the paper. I feel like it also minimizes the chance of the fabric slipping as I stitch around the edges.

7 FabricCuts Quilting That Travels Part 5:  English Paper Piecing Hexies

Making a Hexagon Patch

8 HexagonPatch Quilting That Travels Part 5:  English Paper Piecing Hexies

After laying the hexagon paper piece to the back of the fabric, fold the fabric edges onto the paper piece. Baste around all the edges to secure the paper piece to the fabric. I’ve tried several techniques to prevent the fabric from slipping away from the paper piece–and to make sure I fold the fabric as close to the paper edge as I’m stitching. I’ve tried using pins to hold the pieces together. The best solution I’ve found has been to spray a little quilter’s adhesive (like 501 Spray and Fix) onto the fabric before placing the paper. Basting goes faster if you aren’t struggling to keep the fabric straight around the paper.

9 JoiningHexies Quilting That Travels Part 5:  English Paper Piecing Hexies

Next, join the hexagon shapes with a small, closely stitched whipstitch. Similar to foundation piecing, I leave the basting stitch and piecing papers in until I have all the patches sewn together.

To add a little fun to your hexagon quilt, go modern. (I think this is why I fell in love with Denise’s wall hanging, all the really fun fabric shapes inside a traditional hexagon.) Take a hexagon paper piece; draw lines of any length, shape, direction, size, etc. Use the lines as guides to cut the shapes on the paper piece. Like a puzzle, put the pieces back together again to layout the original hexagon shape.  Cover each of the pieces with fabric. Whipstitch the pieces together. Here is one of the hexies I made for Benjamin’s quilt.

10 HexiePlay Quilting That Travels Part 5:  English Paper Piecing Hexies

I wanted Ben’s quilt to have a scrappy look; scrappy in this case being randomly placed patches, without the look of a lot of structure. The photo below shows my audition of all the hexies I’ve made for the quilt as of today. Check out the very subtle fun hexies I’ve placed for some tricky eye candy! All those atoms floating around, just waiting for him to discover a new solution.

11 BenHexi Quilting That Travels Part 5:  English Paper Piecing Hexies

Check out these links for more information, instruction and tools for your English Paper Piecing Hexagon quilt making.

Inklingo: Hexagons with Linda Franz

A Bit About the Infinite Hexagon by Diane Harris

Garden Pavers Table Runner

Nature’s Harmony Quilt Kit

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 Miss any of Tricia’s other Quilting That Travels tutorials? Read them all here.

For even more on-the-go fun, check out our upcoming online course Sew-On-The-Go with Needle-Turn Hand Applique taught by Deanne Eisenman. This 6-session course will guide you through creating a beautiful appliqué wall hanging.

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New Issue: Quiltmaker September/October ’16

QM1610 COVERx500 New Issue: Quiltmaker September/October ’16

Our September/October ’16 issue of Quiltmaker hits newsstands next week, and we’re so excited to share this new issue with all of you! Inside there are 13 quilt patterns to help you get ready for autumn sewing — some great fall quilts, fun Halloween designs and more. The cover quilt is Scotch on the Rocks designed by QM associate editor Diane Harris. Isn’t it the cutest? The issue also includes three creative ways to use printed panels, a new Bonnie Hunter Addicted to Scraps block, a great article on working with color and more.

Here’s a peek at a few of the quilt patterns:

qm1610040 starcrossed 450flat New Issue: Quiltmaker September/October ’16

Star-Crossed Paths: This queen-sized quilt designed by Cindy LeBaron will be the focus quilt for the upcoming season 4 of Quiltmaker Lessons in Creativity. The two blocks used in the design are easy to make with four basic techniques: Triangle-Squares, Fast Flying Geese, Quarter-Square Triangles and Stitch and Flip. Kits are available for a limited time.

qm1610040 georgie 300style web New Issue: Quiltmaker September/October ’16

Georgie Giraffe: Deb Grogan has created another adorable baby quilt! Deb likes to add dimensional touches to bring her quilts to life, and this design makes it look like sweet Georgie is peeking through the crisscross patchwork. Kits are available for a limited time.

qm1610040 garden 450flat New Issue: Quiltmaker September/October ’16

Garden Gate: Show off pretty floral prints on this gorgeous throw designed by Diane Nagle. Clever placement of the pieced blocks give the design a garden lattice appeal.

qm1610040 batty 350style New Issue: Quiltmaker September/October ’16

Going Batty: QM content director Carolyn Beam made this fun wonky Nine Patch throw. It’s a fast and easy design that looks great in Halloween prints or any colors of your choosing. Check out our Wonky Nine Patch Template set for more wonky Nine Patch fun.

qm1610040 jukebox 450flat New Issue: Quiltmaker September/October ’16

Jukebox: Irene Berry found this pretty vintage quilt top at a flea market, and thought it deserved to be quilted! This is a perfect pattern for scraps and playing around with value. And, the article includes a great tutorial on how to make the wide flanged binding.

Browse our online gallery to preview all 13 quilt patterns included in this issue.

Be sure to keep an eye out for the issue at newsstands, or grab a print or digital edition in our online store. Better yet, subscribe to Quiltmaker so you never miss an issue!

Stay tuned in the coming weeks to learn more about the quilts in this issue. We’ll be welcoming some of the designers as guest bloggers to learn more about their quilts.

Happy Quilting,
Natalie

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100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along – Block 20

Hi! Welcome to block 20 in the 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along.

100BLKS SAMP ALL 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 20

three versions of the 100 Blocks Sampler

All of the quilt blocks in this design have come from the different issues of Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks and have been reduced to 6″. There are kits available in different colorways, as well as a digital pattern. You can catch up on the previous sew along posts here.

Today we’re featuring a block by Julie Herman of Jaybird Quilts. This is Boxed In, block #171 from Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks, volume 2. Check out Julie’s blog as she sews along with us.

171 1 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 20

Boxed In, block #171 designed by Julie Herman

This is a simple block to sew – just squares and rectangles.

171 2 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 20

Boxed In assembly

And, voila!—the finished block in three different colorways.

171 3 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 20

Boxed In in three different colorways

Be sure to check out the designers who are sewing along with us.

Follow the links below to visit their blogs:

Lynn Roddy Brown

Jessie Kurtz

Toby Lischko

I found some canvas-wrapped frames that I’m going to use for the next project using leftover fabric from my sampler quilt. Be sure to come back next week to see what I made. In the meantime, happy sewing!

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It’s a Hit! – the Pfaff performance 5.2

By Lori Baker, Quiltmaker Acquisitions Editor

I’ll admit I’m a sewing machine enthusiast. I have quite a few sewing machines. I’m sitting at work and trying to count in my head – I think I have 9. Some are classics from the 1940s and 50s, some are old reliables from the first decade of this century and some are nearly new.  But still when I’m asked to see what I think of a new machine, I’m instantly excited and ready for the “task,” except it doesn’t feel like a task because it’s just plain fun.

thewholequilt It’s a Hit!   the Pfaff performance 5.2

I spent several hours testing the new Pfaff performance 5.2 a couple of weeks ago. I completed this pretty table topper and I’m completely in love. It’s a beautiful machine, all sleek and shiny. And it’s big. When I unpacked it the first thing I noted was that they were thinking of quilters with that big space to the right of the needle.

performance5.2 It’s a Hit!   the Pfaff performance 5.2

One of the things I am an absolute nag about is reading the manual so once I had the machine unpacked, I spent a while reading. I found the manual easy to read and by the time I was done, there were several things I wanted to check out.

The performance 5.2 has lots of decorative stitches, many are 9mm wide and the maxi stitches (stitches where the fabric is moved side-to-side as well as forward and backward) are up to 48mm wide. So first I had to play with stitches.

The machine comes with a single hole needle plate and a 1/4” foot. That’s so nice for quilters. And they’ve built a sensor in so when the single hole needle plate is on the machine, it reminds you if you select a stitch other than a straight stitch.

needleplate It’s a Hit!   the Pfaff performance 5.2

I had a handful of leftover string-pieced blocks from another project. It’s a funny story about my math mistake that you can read here. So I started trying out stitches on those leftover blocks.

First, I tried some of the simpler ones. I used three different brands and two different weights of thread for the decorative stitching and the machine worked well with all three brands and both weights.

bows It’s a Hit!   the Pfaff performance 5.2

bearclaws It’s a Hit!   the Pfaff performance 5.2

loop It’s a Hit!   the Pfaff performance 5.2

Then, I stitched a scallop to check out the satin stitches.

scallops It’s a Hit!   the Pfaff performance 5.2

Next, I stitched one of the embroidery stitches, a decorative triple stitch, 3 “layers” of thread for a denser looking stitch.

triplestitch It’s a Hit!   the Pfaff performance 5.2

I moved on to a couple of the special functions. I combined two stitches with the sequencing function. But then laughed because there is an identical stitch already built into the machine.

seq It’s a Hit!   the Pfaff performance 5.2

And with Stitch Creator, I edited a stitch. I don’t particularly like my new created stitch but the possibilities are certainly intriguing.

stitchcreator It’s a Hit!   the Pfaff performance 5.2

Stacking stitches are something I’ve not played with a whole lot but I thought this looked wonderful. I stitched the leaves first in light green thread then went back over the same line and stitched the flowers with dark green. With a little practice, you can get the performance 5.2 to stitch the “stem” part so both colors of thread are stitched in the very same place. There are 20 different stacking stitches – 10 sets of 2 stitches that work together.

stackingstitch It’s a Hit!   the Pfaff performance 5.2

The ribbon stitch was the last of the feed-dog driven stitches I used on my quilt top. I love this stitch. It tacks the ribbon in place and then does a few extra stitches on the background fabric, changes direction and goes to the next place to tack the ribbon down. The performance 5.2 has 6 built-in ribbon stitches. Crazy quilters and those people sewing for little girls will love these stitches.

ribbonstitch2 It’s a Hit!   the Pfaff performance 5.2

Another thing I always test when I’m trying out a new machine is the free-motion stitching capabilities. I did a simple loop-de-loop on this little table topper and was super pleased with how nicely it worked. You can see that in all the previous photos.

Then it was on to the label. I chose one of the four 9mm alphabets and easily stitched the words on my label and then added 2 different styles of buttonholes just because I wanted to test the buttonholes.

label It’s a Hit!   the Pfaff performance 5.2

My final analysis – the Pfaff performance 5.2 is a super machine. I’m grateful Pfaff gave me the opportunity to play around on their machine these past few weeks.

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100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along – Block 19

Hi! Welcome to block 19 in the 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along.

100BLKS SAMP ALL 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 19

three versions of the 100 Blocks Sampler

All of the quilt blocks in this design have come from the different issues of Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks and have been reduced to 6″. There are kits available in different colorways, as well as a digital pattern. You can catch up on the previous sew along posts here.

Today’s block is Happy Valley, block # 869 from Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks volume 9. This fun block was designed by Allison Harris of Cluck Cluck Sew—I love that name!

869 1 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 19

Happy Valley, block #869 designed by Allison Harris

This block is made entirely of triangle-squares. It would be fun to play around with fabric combinations in this block.

869 2 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 19

triangle-square unit

Assembly:

869 3 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 19

assembly

Happy Valley in three different colorways:

869 4 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 19

three different colorways

Be sure to check out the designers who are sewing along with us.

Follow the links below to visit their blogs:

Lynn Roddy Brown

Jessie Kurtz

Toby Lischko

Thank you to everyone who left a comment on last week’s blog. The winner is Jennifer. She’s been contacted and her books will be sent shortly!

See you next week.

 

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3 Free Beginner Quilt Patterns!

One of the biggest decisions when learning how to quilt is deciding what pattern to make first. You want a design that’s easy, obviously, but certainly not one that’s boring! For our newest free e-book, we’ve gathered together three of our favorite simple quilt patterns - all with the beginner quilter in mind. There are two throw quilts and a sweet baby quilt; each pattern is eye-catching with its own unique style, but all require only basic sewing skills to create. Take a peek below at the three designs:

Spectrum bl 3 Free Beginner Quilt Patterns!

Spectrum

Spectrum: If you’re looking for a quick, easy and colorful baby quilt, Spectrum is just the ticket! Designed by our Quiltmaker staff, the design makes a perfect baby shower gift and the rainbow of colors will brighten any little one’s nursery. With large fabric patches and a simple arrangement, it’s ideal for any beginning quilter. The finished size is 48″ by 48″.

MediterraneanMosaic bl 3 Free Beginner Quilt Patterns!

Mediterranean Mosiac

Mediterranean Mosiac: Colorful quilt blocks and creative construction form this festive throw quilt designed by Diane Nagle. Three different styles of blocks are used in the design – but all three require just basic sewing skills. The quilt finishes at 67″ by 67″.

GrandSquare bl 3 Free Beginner Quilt Patterns!

Grand Square

Grand Square: Karyn Ashley Smith designed this lovely throw quilt using her Crocus and Daffodil quilt block that was featured in Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks, vol. 11. It’s a great introduction to making patchwork blocks and joining them together. And with just five fabrics, you can easily make it any color scheme. The pattern even includes a quilting motif that you can use when your quilt top is completed. The finished size is 52″ by 52″.

free quilt patterns for beginners 3 Free Beginner Quilt Patterns!

In addition to these three patterns, this free e-book also includes an extra Basic Lessons section to help you learn all kinds of beginning quilting techniques.

If you’re already an experienced quilter, this e-book is also great to have in your personal library for when you want to make a fast, easy and stylish project. Or just to have on hand to share with your new-to-quilting friends!

Click here to download your free copy of the Beginner Quilt Patterns e-book!

As an extra bonus, we’re also having a special Customer Appreciation Sale in our online shop through tomorrow (7/20/16). This annual sale is our way of thanking you for being a part of our QM family. Just use coupon code THANKU20 at checkout to save 20 percent off storewide!

Happy Quilting,
Natalie

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Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo-Yo!

By Tricia Patterson, Quiltmaker Associate Editor

 Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo!

Courtesy of The*Twilight*Muse, blackcrowprimitives.blogspot.com

The Yo-Yo quilt pattern was very trendy in America between the 1920s and 1940s because it was portable and was a good project for extra scraps of fabric. Perhaps it was popular for such an extended time because of a clown doll, much like the one shown in the picture, which appeared between 1930-1940. It’s a common belief that the yo-yo toy, made of two wooden discs and string, first appeared in Greece, China and the Philippines. The Yo-Yo quilt pattern was thought to be a version of the yo-yo, similar in that it had expandable stretching string as the foundation; fabric discs formed the shape of the doll. It’s also believed the Yo-Yo doll may have originated in the Philippines, with the name yo-yo meaning “come-come” in the Philippine language.

The theme of my oldest son’s first bedroom was colorful clowns. I made my first Yo-Yo for a doll much like the one shown above. I didn’t let him play with it because he probably would have chewed the smaller pieces apart, but we sure did have a lot of giggles when I danced the clown in front of his face to make him smile. Years later, a visit with my mother-in-law to her friend’s house in Kentucky gave me a second encounter with the Yo-Yo pattern, where I saw a breath-taking quilt lying on the guest room bed. It was so impressive I recall it today; made of assorted light colored fabrics taken from men’s shirts. It looked like fabric lace lying over a plain dark colored sheet.

2 yoyovest Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo!

Since then I’ve made Yo-Yos for much smaller projects, and interestingly enough, for a lot of wearables. I’ve created very small Yo-Yos for vests.

I’ve used Yo-Yo’s as embellishments on wall hangings, and adorned jackets with Yo-Yos.

3 yoyowallhanging Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo!      4 yoyojacket Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo!

5 yoyojewelry Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo! 5b yoyojewelry Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo!

I’ve even turned a Yo-Yo into jewelry for a hand-dyed dress. As you can see, Yo-Yos are so versatile. There are ideas for all sorts of applications on the web. Just Google “Yo-Yo quilt pattern” to see a bountiful supply.

My granddaughters and I saw these cute Yo-Yo ornaments hanging in the Creative Needle quilt shop we visited. And, I found these patterns by Indygo Junction in the Golden Quilt Company.

12 yoyoornaments Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo!           13 yoyopatterns Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo!

A full Yo-Yo quilt is on my bucket list to make. A quilt takes a lot of Yo-Yos, thousands. I’ve started one several times. I must be getting more rational in my older age because I’m settling for a bed runner. I took this Yo-Yo project along with me on a camping trip last weekend. I’ve included instructions for how I make a Yo-Yo patch, just in case you haven’t made one and would like to start your own quilt­ … or a quilt that finishes into something smaller.

Materials and Preparation Before You Go:

6 yoyoHowTo1 Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo!

Cut out the Yo-Yo circles. You need one for each Yo-Yo. I use a circle pattern I drew onto template plastic many years ago. I use the template to cut a 6″ circle of fabric that makes a 2-3″ Yo-Yo. (The finished width depends on how deep I make my seam allowance and how much I flatten the finished Yo-Yo.)

 

Making a Yo-Yo:

Folding the outside edge of the fabric circle toward the inside 1/4”, sew a long running stitch on top of the folded seam as shown in the photo. I stitch from the inside of the Yo-Yo so it’s easier to fold under the seam as I stitch.

7 yoyoHowTo2 Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo!

Gather the fabric with the stitched thread every 6-10 stitches. Gathering as you go lessens the likelihood your thread will break from the tension of pulling too much fabric together at once.

8 yoyoHowTo3 Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo!

When you’ve stitched all around the circle, pull the thread to gather the rest of the fabric together tightly. From the right side of the Yo-Yo, secure the circle with a couple of tacking stitches. Hand press the Yo-Yo, pulling out the edges to get the gathers to separate for a flatter, more uniform looking, Yo-Yo.

9 yoyoHowTo4 Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo!

Join Yo-Yos by placing two Yo-Yos side by side, backside facing up, to secure them with a small slipstitch. You can also attach Yo-Yo’s to a large sheet of fabric using a blanket stitch or blind stitch, securing the Yo-Yo by stitching completely around the outer edge.

10 yoyoHowTo5 Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo!

Here’s to the start of my Yo-Yo bed runner!

11 yoyoHowTo6 Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo!

14 yoyomakers Hello to Quilting That Travels Part 4: Going Yo Yo!

There are many resources to get you started on a Yo-Yo project. I discovered that Clover distributes makers for many sizes of Yo-Yos (how-to included). More instruction about making Yo-Yos can be found at quiltmaker.com along with a quilt pattern incorporating Yo-Yos, Windblown Blossoms, (featured in the March/April 2010 issue of Quiltmaker). Keepsake Quilting offers a kit for a table runner kit that includes a pattern and all the fabric. The table runner is featured in the July/August 2016 issue of Quilting Quickly.

Maybe it’s time for you to add Yo-Yos to your bucket list!

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 Miss any of our other Quilting That Travels tutorials? Check them out here.

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100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along – Block 18 + giveaway

Hi! Happy Summer! It’s been hot, hot, hot here in Colorado—perfect for staying inside to sew. How is your 100 Blocks Sampler coming along?

100BLKS SAMP ALL 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 18 + giveaway

three versions of the 100 Blocks Sampler

All of the quilt blocks in this design have come from the different issues of Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks and have been reduced to 6″. There are kits available in different colorways, as well as a digital pattern. You can catch up on the previous sew along posts here.

Today’s block is Pinwheel Surprise, block #259 from Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks, vol. 3. This block was designed by Donna Benham. You’ve probably seen Donna’s blocks in several issues of QM’s 100 Blocks.

259 1 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 18 + giveaway

Pinwheel Surprise, block #259, designed by Donna Benham.

There are some quarter-square units and triangle-square units needed for this block:

259 2 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 18 + giveaway

quarter-square units and triangle-square units

Assembly:

259 3 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 18 + giveaway

Pinwheel Surprise assembly

Pinwheel Surprise in three different colorways:

259 4 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 18 + giveaway

Pinwheel Surprise in three different colorways.

Be sure to check out the designers who are sewing along with us.

Follow the links below to visit their blogs:

Lynn Roddy Brown

Jessie Kurtz

Toby Lischko

And now for our giveaway! Leave me a comment telling me if you like sewing small blocks (such as our 6″ sampler blocks) and how many mini quilts you have made. I’ll randomly choose a winner next Tuesday for two fun gifts—The Little Box of Quilter’s Chocolate Desserts and 75 Fun Fat-Quarter Quilts from 14 popular designers including some of our 100 Blocks designers.

giveaway 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 18 + giveaway

giveaway

Join us next week for block #19.

 

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Lessons in Creativity Season 3: Let Freedom Ring

QMK16082 2 Lessons in Creativity Season 3: Let Freedom Ring

Let Freedom Ring

Season 3 of our free video series, Quiltmaker Lessons in Creativity, is here! Our focus quilt this season is Let Freedom Ring, designed by our content director Carolyn Beam for the July/August ’16 issue of Quiltmaker. This gorgeous red, white and blue log cabin throw quilt finishes at 66″ x 66″ inches, and a star design appears from the creative placement of the log cabin blocks. It’s an easy, fun design that you’ll love to create — and, over the course of this eight-episode video series, we’ll show you how to make it your own.

You’ll play with color recipes for the blocks, use a variety of quilting designs, create many interesting quilt options, enhance your sewing and quilting skills and so much more.

Designer and instructor Jenny Kae Parks returns as host of the series — and as anyone who’s watched Jenny knows, she’s a wonderful teacher!  With her expertise and guidance, you’ll learn all kinds of great tips and techniques and have so much fun along the way.

IMG 6791 Lessons in Creativity Season 3: Let Freedom Ring

Jenny Kay Parks in the studio!

The first two episodes are available to watch now. In the first lesson, Jenny demonstrates how to make the log cabin block, using the colors of the original quilt. She’ll show you how to sew all of the patches together, which way to press the seam allowances and what to do if your seam allowance ends up sewn in a direction you didn’t want it to.

LIC 2 Lessons in Creativity Season 3: Let Freedom Ring

In the second lesson, Jenny talks about different tricks you can use to get a perfect 1/4″ seam and demonstrates doing so on long strips, then measures to make sure it’s perfect. She finishes piecing together the last round of a scrappy red, white and blue version of the log cabin quilt block using 1930s prints and lays out that block with other scrappy 1930s prints log cabin quilt blocks in green and white; purple and white; and yellow, white and blue to show different block orientation variations.

Play the video below to watch a season preview. Then, grab your copy of our July/August issue — or get the Let Freedom Ring kit or digital pattern  — and sew along with us!

This video series is free to watch with a free subscription to QNNtv.com, and new episodes are released weekly on Thursdays. Click here to see all episodes of Lessons in Creativity.

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This season of Lessons in Creativity is sponsored by Pfaff and Northcott.

Pfaff logo newl2 Lessons in Creativity Season 3: Let Freedom Ring

Northcott Lessons in Creativity Season 3: Let Freedom Ring

 

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100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along – Block 17

Hi Everyone. Here we are on block #17 of the 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along.

100BLKS SAMP ALL 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 17

three versions of the 100 Blocks Sampler

All of the quilt blocks in this design have come from the different issues of Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks and have been reduced to 6″. There are kits available in different colorways, as well as a digital pattern. You can catch up on the previous sew along posts here.

Today we are featuring a block by Jessie Kurtz, who has been sewing along with us. You can follow her link below. You may remember that we featured another one of her blocks, Bingo, back in March. Today’s block is All Square, block # 789 from Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks, volume 8.

789 1 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 17

All Square, block #789 designed by Jessie Kurtz

This block uses triangle-squares and plain patches and offers lots of possibilities for color and value placement.

789 2 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 17

triangle-square units

Assembly:

789 3 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 17

All Square assembly

All Square in three different colorways:

789 4 100 Blocks Sampler Sew Along   Block 17

All Square in three different colorways.

Be sure to check out the designers who are sewing along with us:

Follow the links below to visit their blogs:

Lynn Roddy Brown

Jessie Kurtz

Toby Lischko

See you next week for Block 18!

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